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Highest redshift observed?

  1. Mar 19, 2006 #1
    Hi, what is the highest redshift observed for any 'object' in the Universe?

    Also, is the Abell-lensed 'object' still viewed as a possible candidate (at Z=10) or have people further studied this lensed 'object' and determined its high redshift as an error?

    Thanks you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 19, 2006 #2

    SpaceTiger

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  4. Mar 19, 2006 #3
    well, technically the highest redshift 'object' oberved thus far is the CMB at z~1100.

    As for the z=10 galaxy, I believe I already answered this in this post in another thread:https://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=936972&postcount=11

    The NED link you refenced in that thread provided 4 references, 1 of which found no evidence of a detection of the z=10 in the H-waveband (where Pello detected it) and the other reanalysed the origional data and failed to detect the line used in the origional analysis to determine a redshift.
     
  5. Mar 19, 2006 #4

    SpaceTiger

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    This is certainly true, though in my experience, that's usually not what people mean. The surface of last scattering can be seen in all directions and doesn't, IMO, constitute a single coherent "object". Chaos, do you understand what the CMB really is and why it might or might not be called the object with the highest redshift?
     
  6. Mar 19, 2006 #5
    True. I was just being smart! I think I remember Charley Lineweaver saying in one of his talks "Those galaxy guys get excited about obseving galaxies at z=7, well that's nothing. I observe the CMB at redshift 1100!" or something along those lines.
     
  7. Mar 19, 2006 #6

    SpaceTiger

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    Yeah, I know what you mean, but I think it really is a good thing for people to keep in mind, particularly when considering the Big Bang Theory. If we really couldn't observe anything past z=7, cosmological theory would be working from a much narrower baseline and there might still be genuine reason to question the expanding universe...

    Probably not, though. :biggrin:
     
  8. Mar 19, 2006 #7
    Yes, I understand the CMB has been redshifted from ~1000nm (3000K) to ~1mm (~2.75K), if memory serves me. Wasn't it released around 380,000LY post BB? And the polarizations in it were left by the Reionization Period?
     
  9. Mar 19, 2006 #8
    Ok, matt.O, so the z-10 object was falsified, gotcha. CMB is an object? Naw, but a funny joke of a concept.
     
  10. Mar 20, 2006 #9

    SpaceTiger

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    Some of the polarization comes from reionization, though much was made at the surface of last scattering (z~1100). We can measure a power spectrum of the polarization anisotropies just like with the temperature and both show multi-peaked structure coming from oscillations in the early universe.
     
  11. Mar 21, 2006 #10

    Are you referring to the 1 degree inhomogenities in the WMAP data?
     
  12. Mar 21, 2006 #11

    SpaceTiger

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    The first acoustic peak is at about one degree, but there are two others at smaller angular scales. The inhomogeneities in polarization caused by reionization are at much larger angular scales (>~20 degrees).
     
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