How are black holes linked to worm holes, or are they the same thing,

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between black holes and wormholes, and the possibility of using them for space travel or accessing other dimensions or universes. The concept of black holes as "leaking" matter into other dimensions is proposed, but there is no observational evidence to support it. Hawking radiation, which suggests that black holes eventually return energy to our universe, is mentioned as a potential explanation. However, there is currently no way to directly observe or measure this phenomenon.
  • #1
16
0
How are black holes linked to worm holes, or are they the same thing, for example can you use any of them to transport through space, and if you can, would it go to a different location of the universe your in, or can it go to another universe as in another dimension?
 
Space news on Phys.org
  • #2


A black hole is simply a mass large enough to create a gravitational field strong enough that light cannot escape it. They do not necessarily have anything to do with wormholes, which are topological anomalies that connect one point in spacetime with another, perhaps very far away. They are hypothetical, and whimsical.

Traveling to "another universe" or "another dimension" are unlikely, whatever they might mean.

- Warren
 
  • #3


'Black Hole' is a collapsed star, with strong gravitational pull. To enter a 'Black Hole' is as to enter into the sun (Only your protons and electrons might escape from suns poll one day, but not from a 'Black Hole':)

'Black Hole' is not a hole..
 
  • #4


Wormholes are theoretical. Meaning, so far they don't exist.
And the conditions needed to have one are so slim I doubt there ever will one. But I could be wrong...
They're the stuff science fiction thrives on.
 
  • #5


Greetings.
I've been watching the TV series "The Universe" and the show was describing how the big bang singularity may have resulted from the bumping of two different dimensions or realities. If all the matter/ energy from our universe came from the dimension 'next to' us, then who says that our dimension can not give matter/ energy back to that dimension?
What I'm saying is that the big bang might have caused a leek of mater into our world, but conversely, what if a black hole is slowly 'leaking' matter/ energy back to the orignal dimension? I'm no physicist yet so I'm only speculating. But since I've never heard of observations of places where matter seems to 'appear from nowhere', I would speculate that the matter is actually being transferred to another universe. Sounds crazy but a visual helps.

Basically, what if black holes are transferring energy from our universe into another one?

Regards,
-Tay
 
  • #6


So far, we haven't been able to do a lot of experiments on black holes, and that's a shame. Even the most universally accepted notions of black holes are not proven by observation or experiment. [Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation] [Broken] None the less, according to (my understanding) of current theory, a BH doesn't spontaneously lose matter. That is, there's no evidence that anything leaves our universe. Hawking has merged general relativity and quantum calculations in an unholy alliance to predict that a BH radiates, and eventually evaporates. But nothing leaves the universe: for a while the matter/energy is stuck in the black hole, but then it radiates out and is back in the observable universe. If we could actually weigh (determine the mass of) a real black hole, and measure its radiation, then we could tell if the accounts were balanced: did the BH lose weight at the same rate as it radiated energy? Until we can do the equivalent, I don't suppose we can rule out strange connections to other dimensions, but we also have no evidence to support them.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7


Agreed, there is no observational evidence of extra dimensions or other universes. Hawking radiation is logical. Black holes must eventually return their sequestered energy to this universe due to the laws of entropy. Hawking radiation, which has been indirectly confirmed, is consistent with this principle.
 

1. What is a black hole?

A black hole is a region in space where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing, including light, can escape from it. It is formed when a massive star dies and collapses under its own gravity.

2. What is a wormhole?

A wormhole is a hypothetical tunnel-like structure in space-time that connects two distant points in the universe. It is theorized to be a shortcut through space-time, allowing for faster-than-light travel.

3. How are black holes and wormholes linked?

Black holes and wormholes are linked through their relationship with space-time. Both are predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity, which describes how gravity affects the fabric of space-time. Black holes are a result of extreme gravitational forces, while wormholes are a theoretical consequence of the warping of space-time.

4. Are black holes and wormholes the same thing?

No, black holes and wormholes are not the same thing. While they are both related to the warping of space-time, they have distinct differences. Black holes are collapsed stars with an event horizon, while wormholes are hypothetical structures that have not been observed or proven to exist.

5. Can wormholes lead to other universes?

There is no evidence to suggest that wormholes could lead to other universes. While some theories propose the existence of parallel universes, there is currently no way to confirm or access them through wormholes. Wormholes are still a highly theoretical concept and their existence has not been proven.

Similar threads

Replies
2
Views
677
  • Cosmology
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Cosmology
Replies
24
Views
2K
Replies
36
Views
3K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
29
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
49
Views
4K
  • Cosmology
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
15
Views
2K
Back
Top