How can I get my dog to teach me a new trick? (serious q.)

  • Thread starter DaveC426913
  • Start date
In summary, Luna learned to wait for a reward in order to get what she wanted, and learned how to identify her owner by name.
  • #1

DaveC426913

Gold Member
22,397
6,087
I want to get my* dog to tell me when she needs to go outside.
* not actually my dog

Her current "signal" is to simply pace back and forth from the foyer to the dining room. Unfortunately, this is pretty normal behavior for her (because she's highly intelligent and therefore gets bored). So I don't notice right away she needs to go out until she's desperate.

When I finally get up to let her out, she jumps at the door - but she does not do that until I'm up and moving (i.e. too late to be useful as a signal).

There's a set of chimes next to the door knob right next to where she jumps, and I jangle it every time I open the door for her. I was really hoping she would learn to do her jumps two inches to the right, and would this jangle them when she wanted to go out, but she does not.

She's a 7 year old giant German Spitz. Like this, but 50 lbs.:
1664222646841.png
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #3
Thank you. It quite frankly never occurred to me that this was a Googleable thing. (As a first-time animal owner, it just never occurred to me that there were other owners who might have had this particular problem. Or that I had acquired generic life skills (like Googling) that could be applied).
 
  • Like
Likes jack action
  • #4
DaveC426913 said:
Thank you. It quite frankly never occurred to me that this was a Googleable thing. (As a first-time animal owner, it just never occurred to me that there were other owners who might have had this particular problem. Or that I had acquired generic life skills (like Googling) that could be applied).
Some of us are interested in what success results from your effort.
 
  • Like
Likes Wrichik Basu
  • #5
Racing ahead:
Once your dog gets you trained, you'll be going to the door a lot more. Sometimes because she (apparently) just wants to see you get up. IMHO, a dog door is worth whatever trouble is required (if that's an option for you).
 
  • #6
Dullard said:
Racing ahead:
Once your dog gets you trained, you'll be going to the door a lot more. Sometimes because she (apparently) just wants to see you get up.
One of those videos addresses that issue of "does she need to go pee, or does she just want to go outside?"

Besides, this dog is highly intelligent and needs a lot of mental stimulation. And is needy.
If going outside whenever she wants helps enrich her life, I'm all for it.

Dullard said:
IMHO, a dog door is worth whatever trouble is required (if that's an option for you).
I installed dog doors on either end of my (detached) porch/deck so she can move freely. But I have decided not to install one on the house. We have a pond and a pool, so I don't want her going out without someone knowing about it.
 
  • Like
Likes Dullard
  • #7
She had her first training session today with a pro dog trainer.

Lesson 1: 'It's your choice'
In which Luna learns to choose to wait for a reward over trying to grab what's in front of her.

Lesson 2: 'What's your name?'
In which Luna learns that if she looks to her owner when her name is called, she will get rewarded.
 

1. How do I start teaching my dog a new trick?

The first step is to choose a specific trick that you want to teach your dog. Make sure it is something that is suitable for your dog's breed and age. Then, gather some treats and find a quiet and distraction-free area to begin training.

2. What is the best way to communicate with my dog during training?

The key to successful training is clear and consistent communication. Use verbal cues, such as "sit" or "roll over", along with hand signals to help your dog understand what you want them to do. Positive reinforcement, such as treats and praise, can also be effective in motivating your dog to learn.

3. How long will it take for my dog to learn a new trick?

The amount of time it takes for a dog to learn a new trick can vary depending on the complexity of the trick and the individual dog's learning abilities. Some dogs may pick up a new trick in a few minutes, while others may take weeks of consistent training. Be patient and remember to keep training sessions short and fun for your dog.

4. What should I do if my dog is not responding to the training?

If your dog is not responding to the training, it could be due to a variety of reasons. They may not understand what you are asking of them, or they may be distracted or tired. Take a break and try again later. It may also be helpful to seek professional training advice if you are having difficulty teaching your dog a new trick.

5. How can I make sure my dog remembers the trick in the long term?

Consistency is key when it comes to ensuring your dog remembers a new trick in the long term. Practice the trick regularly, and use positive reinforcement and rewards to reinforce the behavior. It may also be helpful to periodically review and refresh the trick to keep it fresh in your dog's mind.

Similar threads

Replies
12
Views
887
  • General Discussion
Replies
24
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
16
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
6
Views
761
Replies
19
Views
980
  • General Discussion
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
648
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
17
Views
2K
Back
Top