How do I calculate the mass of a moving object?

In summary, to find the couch's mass, we can use the formula Fs = μsN, where N = mgcosθ and F = ma. With a force of 350 Newtons at 30 degrees below the horizontal and a coefficient of friction of μs = 0.4, we can calculate the force of static friction to be 140 N. However, the equation ΣFx = (350) = (2m/s) * M + 2 (0.4) * M - 2(0.3 M) is incorrect. Reconsideration of the calculation of the force of friction is needed.
  • #1
Joseph Hotto

Homework Statement



Someone mistakenly threw away a lovely couch, and you decide to take it back to your apartment. You push it with a force of 350 Newtons and at 30 degrees below the horizontal at 2 m/s. The coefficents of friction are μs = 0.4 and μf = 0.3. What is the couch's mass?

Homework Equations


Fs = μsN
N = mgcosθ
F = ma

The Attempt at a Solution


Fs = (0.4) (350 N)
= 140 N <- Force of static friction
ΣFx = (350) = (2m/s) * M + 2 (0.4) * M - 2(0.3 M)
350N = mg (cos(330 degrees)
350 = 0.866 mg
 
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  • #2
Reconsider your calculation of the force of friction.
The quantity (2 m/s)*M is not a force. The entire equaiton for ΣFx is incorrect.
 

Related to How do I calculate the mass of a moving object?

1. How do I calculate the mass of a moving object using its velocity and momentum?

In order to calculate the mass of a moving object using its velocity and momentum, you can use the formula mass = momentum / velocity. This formula is derived from the equation for momentum, p = mv, where p is momentum, m is mass, and v is velocity.

2. Can I use the same equation to calculate the mass of an object regardless of its direction of motion?

Yes, the equation mass = momentum / velocity can be used to calculate the mass of an object regardless of its direction of motion. This is because momentum and velocity are both vector quantities, meaning they have both magnitude and direction.

3. How can I calculate the mass of a moving object if I only know its kinetic energy?

If you only have information about the kinetic energy of a moving object, you can use the formula mass = 2 * kinetic energy / velocity^2. This formula is derived from the equation for kinetic energy, KE = 1/2 * mv^2, where KE is kinetic energy, m is mass, and v is velocity.

4. Is it possible to calculate the mass of a moving object using its displacement and time instead of velocity and momentum?

Yes, it is possible to calculate the mass of a moving object using its displacement and time. You can use the equation mass = displacement * time^2 / 2. This formula is derived from the equations for displacement, d = v0 * t + 1/2 * a * t^2, and momentum, p = m * v, where d is displacement, t is time, v0 is initial velocity, and a is acceleration.

5. Are there any other factors that may affect the accuracy of my calculated mass of a moving object?

Yes, there are other factors that may affect the accuracy of your calculated mass of a moving object. These include air resistance, friction, and other external forces acting on the object. It is important to take these factors into consideration when calculating the mass of a moving object.

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