How do I get to where I want to go?

  • Thread starter w3tw1lly
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation revolves around a 15-year-old's interest in pursuing a career in computer science and their concerns about the necessary courses and requirements for admission to the University of Waterloo. The experts suggest focusing on courses in computer programming and mathematics and recommend doing well in school and participating in competitions. The individual also asks about the role of math in computer programming and expresses a desire to plan ahead for their future career.
  • #1
w3tw1lly
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Well, I'm not sure if you guys really want me here (I am only 15), but I just want to know, what do I need to do to do to get to where I want to go? I am looking definatley into something with computers in it. I think I would do good, but what courses do I need to get to some sort of computer science course at the Univeristy of Waterloo? I know you might be saying "Go ask your school.", but I sort of did before and I never really got a clear answer. And one last question, is it worth it? In other words, will there be a demand for computer scientists in the future? I am not looking for specific course codes or anything just say something in general. I am sorry if this is an unanswerable question unless you have visited my school. The reason why I came here is it appears there are some EXTREMELY intelligent individuals on these forums.
 
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  • #2
w3tw1lly said:
Well, I'm not sure if you guys really want me here (I am only 15), but I just want to know, what do I need to do to do to get to where I want to go? I am looking definatley into something with computers in it. I think I would do good, but what courses do I need to get to some sort of computer science course at the Univeristy of Waterloo? I know you might be saying "Go ask your school.", but I sort of did before and I never really got a clear answer. And one last question, is it worth it? In other words, will there be a demand for computer scientists in the future? I am not looking for specific course codes or anything just say something in general. I am sorry if this is an unanswerable question unless you have visited my school. The reason why I came here is it appears there are some EXTREMELY intelligent individuals on these forums.

I'm sure you can just jump in and take a Computer Science course.

Start with a first year course. You don't really need anything else for now.
 
  • #3
First, yes, you're very welcome to be here! I hope you'll stick around and continue participating (and especially note the HW Help forums and the Technology Forums, both of which may be of particular interest for you).

I don't know what classes you have offered at your school, or what Waterloo's specific requirements are, but generally, you'll want to be strong in any computer programming classes your school offers and strong math scores should help too. If you don't have much choice of the classes you take, then the most important thing is, of course, to do your best in whatever you do take. That's where the homework help forums come in handy.

You can also search the websites of the colleges you're interested in and see what they list as their admissions requirements. If something isn't clear, there's usually someone listed you can contact by phone or email to ask additional questions.
 
  • #4
Oh, I missed the I'm 15 thing. I thought you were already there.

I would focus on doing well in school. Specifically, Computer courses (maybe do extra on your own time) and Mathematics courses. Those are the key courses.

Do extremely well because Waterloo is competitive, so you might have to do more than just that. Like, joining competitions even if you do bad. The mere sake of participating looks good. Talk to teachers at your own high school for information on how to participate because you most likely have "training" sessions.

GOOD LUCK!
 
  • #5
Thank you for welcoming me here. Yes I will most likely stay as I find what you guys discuss in some of the forums fascinating even though some of it I don't understand.

On another note, my question wasn't really properly thought out. It was actually a bad idea to ask on forums, as you guys wouldn't know what my school offers.

I also have one more question, if you don't mind. When I enrolled in this Visual Basic course at my school (the only programming course avaliable at my grade), the course description said, Requires Good math and logic. Well, I know what it means by logic, but the math I wasn't so sure about because I havn't really done anything mathematically hard. I asked my teacher what the course description meant, and he said the course description says that because generally, people that do good in math do good in computer programming courses. Now he could be right but I sometimes like to make sure, so is he right, or is it in later and more complicated computer languages does the math begin?

I hope I am not planning too early, but from my view, I THINK it is probably better to plan ahead. The main reason why, is I really thought the other day what I am going to do for a living, and I had always had being a programmer my number one priority, but I never really researched on what I need to achieve that goal.
 
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  • #6
w3tw1lly said:
Thank you for welcoming me here. Yes I will most likely stay as I find what you guys discuss in some of the forums fascinating even though some of it I don't understand.

On another note, my question wasn't really properly thought out. It was actually a bad idea to ask on forums, as you guys wouldn't know what my school offers.

I also have one more question, if you don't mind. When I enrolled in this Visual Basic course at my school (the only programming course avaliable at my grade), the course description said, Requires Good math and logic. Well, I know what it means by logic, but the math I wasn't so sure about because I havn't really done anything mathematically hard. I asked my teacher what the course description meant, and he said the course description says that because generally, people that do good in math do good in computer programming courses. Now he could be right but I sometimes like to make sure, so is he right, or is it in later and more complicated computer languages does the math begin?

Yeah, people that are good in mathematics are usually good in programming and vice versa.

You'll learn more about why this is later on.

I'm sure you are ready for the course. Focus on doing well on all your courses, even history, and most importantly have fun on Visual Basics.

I only know how to program on Visual Basics, and it's easy and fun to use. The best way to learn programming in the beginning.
 
  • #7
Visual Basic as an intro course? I learned good ole regular Basic on a Trash 80 (Tandy-Radio-Shack TRS 80) wen I was a kid! In college Fortran 77 was the main computer language requirement for scientists/engineers! I didn't get fancy with "Visual Basic and Visual C++" until I graduated from undergrad. My-oh-my have things changed...

But if the specific course is offered for your grade level, chances are you'll be prepared... You'll probably just be using a bit of algebra and geometry. Both mathematics and programming are "logical languages"... and like JasonRox says: "just jump in -- you don't really need anything else" (but maybe Enthusiasm!). :tongue:
 

1. How do I determine where I want to go?

To determine where you want to go, you can start by identifying your interests, values, and goals. Reflect on what brings you joy and fulfillment, and consider what you envision for your future. You can also seek advice from mentors, explore different career paths, and try new experiences to gain a better understanding of what you want.

2. What steps should I take to achieve my goals?

The first step is to set specific, achievable goals. Then, create a plan that outlines the steps you need to take to reach those goals. This plan should include timelines, resources you may need, and potential challenges you may face. It's also important to regularly review and adjust your plan as needed.

3. How can I stay motivated and focused on my path?

Staying motivated and focused on your path can be challenging, but there are a few strategies you can try. First, remind yourself of the reasons why you chose this path and the goals you want to achieve. You can also break down your goals into smaller, more manageable tasks and celebrate each accomplishment along the way. Additionally, surround yourself with supportive and like-minded individuals who can provide encouragement and accountability.

4. What resources are available to help me get to where I want to go?

There are numerous resources available to help you on your journey. These include career counselors, mentors, networking opportunities, educational programs, and online resources. You can also seek guidance from successful individuals in your field, attend workshops and conferences, and join professional organizations to expand your knowledge and skills.

5. How can I overcome obstacles and setbacks along the way?

Obstacles and setbacks are inevitable, but it's important to have a positive mindset and persistence to overcome them. One approach is to view challenges as opportunities for growth and learning. You can also seek support from others, seek advice from those who have faced similar obstacles, and remind yourself of your goals and motivation. Don't be afraid to adjust your plan if needed, and remember that setbacks are a natural part of any journey to success.

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