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How do I measure the binding energy of a molecule?

  1. Oct 22, 2016 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2016 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    The authors probably looked it up in a big book (or online).
    The binding energy is the work needed to separate the molecule... there are lots of ways of figuring that out experimentally.
    I don't know the specific methods used for HeO... look at how the molecule is formed. But it looks like the dissociation energy should be straight forward to get.
    What is the concern here?
     
  4. Oct 23, 2016 #3
    Thank you for the response! I was wondering what this equation would like for other gas molecules (Eg. hydrogen):

    EBindng=ΔE≈3BμB/2(MMax−MMin)

    I didn't understand how to measure the binding energy for an equation like this, but I may have found a solution in this video describing how to calculate the wavelength of light required to break a chemical bond:



    Please let me know if I'm on the right track!
     
  5. Oct 23, 2016 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    There is a difference between measuring something and calculating it.
     
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