How do we say that the universe we live is 3 dimensional?

In summary: Remember that science is all about what we can observe. What some alien or higher-dimensional being can or cannot see is irrelevant, as we are stuck firmly here in the 3-dimensional world.
  • #1
3
0
i opine that the universe is not 3 dimensional at all. its not build up of 3 coordinates at all. it is because, we humans could see 3 dimensions it doesn't mean the space metric is of 3 dimensions. suppose there's a super being living on an Earth like planet of some other galaxy whose viewing capacity is of say a complex dimension(i don't want to use the term multi-dimensions or something else), for that being, the whole physics is completely different, may be because of dimensional power of observing objects and their motion, the physics for him would be more simple and elegant.
 
Space news on Phys.org
  • #2
Remember that science is all about what we can observe. What some alien or higher-dimensional being can or cannot see is irrelevant, as we are stuck firmly here in the 3-dimensional world. For information on why we say the universe is 3-dimensional, see here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimension#Spatial_dimensions
 
  • #3
okay, what about string theories then, string theorists say we live in a 3 dimensional membrane of the multidimensional space of universe.

what my point is, 3 dimensional analysis is not the only reality but there's something else beyond our 3 dimensional physics. also, as string theories rely on extra dimensions, it could mathematically reconcile general relativity and quantum physics...
 
  • #4
Altamash said:
okay, what about string theories then, string theorists say we live in a 3 dimensional membrane of the multidimensional space of universe.

Indeed but it is nothing like what you're imagining and there is no evidence supporting string theory over any other physical theory.

Altamash said:
what my point is, 3 dimensional analysis is not the only reality but there's something else beyond our 3 dimensional physics.

I'm not sure where you're getting this from. There are exactly zero mainstream, accepted theories used to model things in real life that have more than 3 spatial dimensions. There are certainly other theories out there with more than 3 spatial dimensions, but they are not accepted as of yet (mainly because we have yet to find a situation where they describe space better than GR).
 
  • Like
Likes Altamash
  • #5
Altamash said:
i opine that the universe is not 3 dimensional at all. its not build up of 3 coordinates at all. it is because, we humans could see 3 dimensions it doesn't mean the space metric is of 3 dimensions. suppose there's a super being living on an Earth like planet of some other galaxy whose viewing capacity is of say a complex dimension(i don't want to use the term multi-dimensions or something else), for that being, the whole physics is completely different, may be because of dimensional power of observing objects and their motion, the physics for him would be more simple and elegant.

Since this is a topic marked "Advanced", then you should be able to understand classical mechanics. Thus, this link will be of interest: http://usersguidetotheuniverse.com/index.php/2013/12/03/a-technical-post-on-more-than-3-dimensions/

Essentially, Bertrand's theorem: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertrand's_theorem tells us that dimensionality >3 means that there are no closed orbits. Which I'll think you'd agree, is fairly essential us to be here.
 
  • Like
Likes Drakkith and Altamash

1. What does it mean for the universe to be 3-dimensional?

In physics, dimensionality refers to the number of coordinates needed to locate a point in space. In the case of the universe, it means that we need three coordinates (length, width, and height) to describe the position of any object within it.

2. How do we know that the universe is 3-dimensional?

Scientists use various methods, such as observations and mathematical models, to determine the dimensionality of the universe. These methods have consistently shown that the universe we live in is 3-dimensional.

3. Is it possible for the universe to have more than 3 dimensions?

Some theories, such as string theory, propose that there may be more dimensions in the universe beyond the three that we experience. However, these extra dimensions are thought to be curled up or compactified, so they are not directly observable by us.

4. How does the concept of time fit into the 3-dimensional universe?

Time is often considered as the fourth dimension in the universe. However, it is different from the spatial dimensions in that it is not possible to move freely through time. It is often described as the "arrow of time" that moves in one direction.

5. Are there any other theories about the dimensionality of the universe?

Yes, there are some theories, such as the holographic principle, that propose the universe may be a projection from a lower-dimensional reality. However, these theories are still being explored and have not been widely accepted by the scientific community.

Suggested for: How do we say that the universe we live is 3 dimensional?

Replies
24
Views
873
Replies
34
Views
2K
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
904
Replies
11
Views
2K
Replies
22
Views
1K
Replies
15
Views
502
Replies
56
Views
3K
Back
Top