How Do You Calculate a(t+dt) Using the Velocity Verlet Algorithm?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the use of the velocity verlet algorithm for simulating the position, velocity, and acceleration of a particle. The relevant equations, including the Langevin equation and the use of a fluctuating force, are mentioned. The individual is unsure about how to calculate a(t+dt) and wonders if they can use v(t) in the equation. The conversation also briefly mentions alternative methods such as the Runge-Kutta family and the midpoint rule.
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shad0w2000
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Homework Statement



I am going to use the velocity verlet algorithm to simulate the position, velocity and acceleration at time t of some particle.

Homework Equations



We got the Langevin equation: a(t) = -v(t)/tau - U'(x) / m + F_f(t) / m

Where tau is the mass divided by the friction coefficient, U'(x(t)) the external force and F_f(t) the fluctuating force. Let's say the external force is harmonic, ½kx(t)^2, so U'(x(t)) / m = kx(t)/m.

I have so far typed in x(t+dt), v(t+dt/2) and I need to find what a(t+dt) is. It's easier if you go see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verlet_integration" for the equations i refer to :)

As for a(t+dt) I am in doubt how I should find this, what I tried so far is:

a(t+dt) = -1/m * dV(x(t+dt))/dx

= -v(t) / tau - k*x(t+dt) / m + F_f(t)

(Where I take the value of the fluctuating force randomly from a normaldistribution)

My doubt is about the use of v(t), can I use v(t) in the above equation? I don't see how many other options I have since we need a(t+dt) to be able to calculate v(t+dt), or have I missed something?

I hope someone can help me a bit, if you need more info or anything is unclear, please tell me here.
 
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  • #2
No one able to help? :)
 
  • #3
The verlet integrator is semi-implicit, which means exactly what you've noticed: you need [tex]v(t+dt)[/tex] to calculate [tex]a(t+dt)[/tex]. In general this means that you need to solve an equation at each step (numerically). Do you have to use Verlet? The usual Runge-Kutta family is pretty good, or even just plain ol' midpoint rule?
 

Related to How Do You Calculate a(t+dt) Using the Velocity Verlet Algorithm?

1. What is the Verlet algorithm?

The Verlet algorithm is a numerical integration method commonly used in physics and engineering to numerically solve equations of motion. It is particularly useful for simulating systems with complex and changing interactions, such as molecular dynamics simulations.

2. How does the Verlet algorithm work?

The Verlet algorithm works by using position and velocity information at two consecutive time steps to calculate the position at the next time step. This is achieved through a set of equations that take into account the acceleration and previous positions and velocities of the system.

3. What are the advantages of using the Verlet algorithm?

There are several advantages of using the Verlet algorithm, including its simplicity, accuracy, and stability. It also conserves energy and is computationally efficient compared to other numerical integration methods.

4. When is the Verlet algorithm most commonly used?

The Verlet algorithm is commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, where it is used to model the movements and interactions of particles in a system. It is also used in other fields such as computer graphics and astrophysics.

5. Are there any limitations to the Verlet algorithm?

One limitation of the Verlet algorithm is that it is not suitable for systems with rapidly changing interactions, as it assumes a constant acceleration at each time step. It also requires an initial set of positions and velocities, which can be challenging to obtain for complex systems.

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