How Does an E Baryon Decay into a D Baryon and a Photon?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the decay of an E baryon into a D baryon and a photon. In the lab frame, the decay would appear with the D baryon and photon coming off at a 90 degree angle. In the rest frame of the E baryon, the photon and D baryon would approach each other with equal and opposite momentum. For D to have maximum energy, it must have equal and opposite momenta to the photon. The rest masses of the D and E baryons are not mentioned and the necessity of a 90 degree angle in the lab frame is questioned. In the rest frame of the E baryon, the photon and D baryon must have a
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Inara
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An E baryon, traveling with an energy of 2 GeV, decays electromagnetically into a D baryon and a photon.

Sketch how this decay might appear in the general case
(i) in the lab frame
E D
A. Essentially I assume you will have ----> <
photon
(with the photon and D coming off that with a 90 degree angle between them.

(ii) in the rest frame of the E baryon.

A.
Photon D
------> E <------ The photon approaching each other with equal and opposite momentum.

What conditions are necessary for D to have maximum energy.

A. D must have equal and opposite momenta to the photon.
 
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  • #2
I can't find any references for D baryons and E baryons. Do you have rest masses for these? I'm not seeing why there has to be a 90° angle in the lab frame. In the rest frame of the E Baryon the D baryon and the photon must have 180° angle between them.
 
  • #3
This means that the decay must occur at a 90 degree angle in the lab frame. Additionally, the energy of the E baryon must be fully transferred to the D baryon and the photon, meaning that the E baryon must have a large enough energy to provide this maximum energy to the D baryon.
 

Related to How Does an E Baryon Decay into a D Baryon and a Photon?

1. What is the theory of relativity?

The theory of relativity is a scientific theory proposed by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century. It states that the laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion, and that the speed of light in a vacuum is constant.

2. What is the difference between special relativity and general relativity?

Special relativity deals with the laws of physics in inertial reference frames (i.e. frames that are not accelerating). General relativity extends this to non-inertial reference frames, including those that are accelerating. Additionally, special relativity deals with the effects of uniform motion, while general relativity deals with the effects of gravity.

3. How does relativity affect our understanding of time and space?

Relativity states that time and space are not absolute, but rather are relative to the observer's frame of reference. This means that time can appear to pass at different rates for different observers, and the perceived distance between objects can also vary depending on the observer's motion.

4. What is the significance of Einstein's famous equation, E=mc²?

This equation, known as the mass-energy equivalence equation, shows that mass and energy are interchangeable. It has been confirmed through various experiments, and it is a fundamental principle of modern physics. It also led to the development of nuclear energy and nuclear weapons.

5. Can you provide an example of how relativity has been applied in real-world situations?

One example is the Global Positioning System (GPS). The satellites used in GPS are orbiting the Earth at high speeds, which causes time dilation according to the theory of relativity. To account for this, the clocks on the satellites are adjusted to match the clocks on Earth, allowing for accurate location tracking. Without considering relativity, GPS would not be as accurate as it is today.

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