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How does the ocean affect daily temperatures?

  1. Sep 22, 2011 #1
    Just a random practise question ive been given. Is it because the closer you are to the coast, the cooler it is, because you are closer to a large amount of cooler substance? (only theory ive come up with:P) please reply!!!! thankyou :D
     
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  3. Sep 22, 2011 #2

    turbo

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    Have you studied this? The effect of on-shore and off-shore breezes on coastal temperatures can be critical to your weather. In coastal Maine, it is the main driver of short-term crap.

    Sunny days in the spring or early summer causes air to rise so that air comes in from the cold Gulf of Maine and causes very low temps. This can trigger pretty quick-forming fog-banks, too.
     
  4. Sep 22, 2011 #3

    PhanthomJay

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    In some regions in the winter near the coast, you are closer to a large amount of a warmer substance. Does that change your response?
     
  5. Sep 22, 2011 #4
    not really, this sounds more like a geology question lol, we're studying basic thermal physics, i thought this question was more about thermal equilibrium
     
  6. Sep 22, 2011 #5

    turbo

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    Can thermal equilibrium be reached without sensible, measurable changes in the materials in question?
     
  7. Sep 22, 2011 #6
    i wouldnt have a clue:( does the answer have something to do with thermal equilibrium, or is it just about wind currents
    ?
     
  8. Sep 22, 2011 #7

    PhanthomJay

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    I've been on the coast in summer where the ocean temp (in degrees F) was in the 60's, the air temp on the beach was in the 70's with a sea breeze, and the air temp a lone mile away from the ocean was in the 90's.

    I've been on the coast in the winter with a wind off the ocean where ocean temp was in the 40's, beach temp was in the 40's, and a mile away temps were in the 30's.

    What does that tell 'ya, if anything?
     
  9. Sep 22, 2011 #8
    that inland is more extreme weather im guessing lol. i just need to justify why that is
     
  10. Sep 22, 2011 #9

    PhanthomJay

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    You must come to your own conclusion as to how the ocean affects daily temperatures. The question is vague in that it does not refer to coastal regions, but i assume this is the intent of the question. The ocean has little effect on temperatures on land far from the coastal regions (excluding the effects of El Nino and La Nina oceanic-atmospheric interaction causing above or below normal temperatures in certain parts of the world, which is more of a a meteorological discussion).

    I'll give you another real world example of Life on the Beach:cool: .

    11 AM, August,
    ocean temperature 68,
    wind blowing from land toward the water,
    air temperture on the beach 85

    2 PM, same day,
    same ocean temp,
    wind blowing from the water toward land,
    air temp on the beach 75

    4 PM same day
    same ocean temp
    wind blowing from land toward water
    Air temp on the beach 90

    Your conclusion, please.
     
  11. Sep 23, 2011 #10

    olivermsun

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    It's a practice question, so you can get practice answers for it :wink:

    But to sort of add to what some of the other posters have said:

    From a thermal physics standpoint, you might argue the local temperature has less variability because the nearby ocean has such a large heat capacity.

    Add some some meteorology, and you might argue that temperature tends to be cooler than inland because the sea breeze usually blows from the cooler side toward the hotter side (no matter which side is the otter side). Also, less extreme temps. due to the increased humidity and formation of a marine layer which isolates the coastal area.

    Add some oceanography and you may conclude that coastal temperatures tend to be strongly affected by sea surface temperature, which is itself affected by currents, winds, upwelling, etc.
     
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