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How many hours do you work per week?

  1. Jul 14, 2010 #1
    Just wondering.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 14, 2010 #2
    Between 90-98 I believe ..
     
  4. Jul 14, 2010 #3
    40 hours.
     
  5. Jul 14, 2010 #4

    drizzle

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    40 I guess... You better do a poll!
     
  6. Jul 14, 2010 #5
    Thanks for answering so far everybody

    :eek: Great Scott BAtmaN!
     
  7. Jul 14, 2010 #6
    Two courses+internship+bit of insantity for starting new projects like crazy! First I started just documenting some old processes for my project and but withing a month ended up handling everything and replacing potential contractor work .. then initiated three new projects.

    But I have mostly been +70-80 (school work, classes, labs) for last 2-3 years and bit higher during internships .. like most of the engineering students unless you don't want to.
     
  8. Jul 14, 2010 #7
    Zero
     
  9. Jul 14, 2010 #8

    turbo

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    In past years, I sometimes worked over 90 hours per week (construction superintendent) and generally over 60 hours per week for years (paper machine operator), though when we started up the paper machine, I worked 84 hours per week for months and months. Very hard physical labor in hot and humid conditions.

    Now, I work tending my garden, doing yard-work, dealing with firewood, taking care of snow in the winter, etc.
     
  10. Jul 14, 2010 #9
    Doesn't it get very hard to do these kind of things when you reach middle / older age? Personally, I noticed people get back/carpal/other problems and stop taking too much of work. I have some years before I reach that stage
     
  11. Jul 14, 2010 #10

    Dr Transport

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    45-50 at work, 50-60 at the house.....
     
  12. Jul 14, 2010 #11

    Evo

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    I put in 92 hours a week when I was young, but most of those years I worked out of my home and traveled to see clients. Then my job changed to sitting in an office and I cut my hours back by almost half.
     
  13. Jul 14, 2010 #12

    Pythagorean

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    What percentage of work hours do you think are productive?
     
  14. Jul 14, 2010 #13

    turbo

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    By the time I reached 36, I quit the paper mill and went to work as a consultant. I still put in a LOT of hours on some contracts, including traveling, but at least I didn't have to pound my poor feet and knees up and down concrete floors in horrible heat and humidity. I have had a lot of cartilage removed from both knees, so now, I am bone-on-bone in large part and have to put up with degenerative arthritis and additional joint pain.

    Working as a consultant was generally more remunerative than working as the lead operator of a high-speed paper machine, but I got to do a lot of the work at home, and less in the mills. My fellow organic-gardening neighbor is still working in that paper mill, and though I have 10 years on him, I fear that it is only dedication and denial that is keeping him at that job. We are both physically wrecked by that business.
     
  15. Jul 14, 2010 #14
    For a time when I was out of school I used to pull 90-100 hours for months at a time, sevens days a week. Just waked up at 5:30 AM and went to work, came back home by 10:00-11:00 PM, and then passed out. One time I was so tired I actually caused a car accident.

    But those were the good days. The job layed off lots of people, and then closed the shop two months later in my state.

    For a time when going to school, same thing, worked more than 100 hours/week at certain times.

    Now I'd be lucky to make it 40 hours.
     
  16. Jul 14, 2010 #15

    russ_watters

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    ~40 the past couple of years with the economy down. I'm only guaranteed 36, so that counts as "overtime" for now.
     
  17. Jul 14, 2010 #16

    russ_watters

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    Wow, that's like 600 hours a week!
    Oh, ok, now I get it. :tongue2:
     
  18. Jul 14, 2010 #17
    Thanks for this info rootX. I'm in my first year for physics. I don't know what I'll do with myself in my junior and senior year!
     
  19. Jul 14, 2010 #18

    cronxeh

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    40. Used to be 72 for 6 months, before that used to be 72-80 with second and third gig for 1 year.. Before that was a solid 36 for 3 years, before that I was a nobody, so zero.
     
  20. Jul 14, 2010 #19
    Yikes! But gardening can be tedious also. I was transferring some plants one summer and I thought I was going to pass out

    Thanks for your answers everybody!
     
  21. Jul 14, 2010 #20
    just meant to squeeze in that I worked seven days a week.
     
  22. Jul 14, 2010 #21
    I actually have no opinion in this respect!!
     
  23. Jul 14, 2010 #22

    turbo

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    I worked some hellacious hours in college, too. Engineering school with an honors program added on, plus buying, refurbishing, and selling amps and guitars, plus playing frat parties on Friday and Saturday nights. I couldn't make enough enough money in the summers doing mill-work to keep me solvent during the school year - thus the side-lines. I was a busy guy.
     
  24. Jul 14, 2010 #23

    cronxeh

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    I bet you were getting busy too, you stud muffin musicano
     
  25. Jul 14, 2010 #24
    :rofl:
     
  26. Jul 14, 2010 #25

    turbo

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    Gotta make time for the important stuff. When the frat brothers were hollering for "Gloria" and "House of the Rising Sun" I'd make eye-contact with their dance partners, with the absolute certainty that many of the brothers would be worthless before the evening ended and at least some of the ladies would still want to party.
     
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