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Other How should I tailor my Master's in Applied Physics

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so at this point, my interest in going back for a master's degree (my bachelor is in physics), is because I just want to find a job. But this time I want to be smarter about it than I was the first time around. I want to go in with a plan. When I'm working on my Applied Physics degree, I can get a "general applied physics" education, or I can get one that is focused. based on my experience with my bachelor's degree, I think it best to focus my master's degree towards a career in something specific. I need to learn some useful skills that can get me employment.

I realize there are numerous career opportunities available, but what are the most "realistic" ones? I mean what are the ones that I will be most likely to find work in? Some careers are so obscure that they only have one position on the planet. Others have many openings but 10,000 applicants applying for those openings. Are there any "realistic" ones that I might actually have a chance of getting if I focus my degree towards it?

At this point I just want something to shoot for. I may like it, I may not. If I don't, I'll be ok if I am well-compensated. And I'll have an experience to enable me to redirect my focus.

edit: when I say well-compensated, I would be ecstatic to make more than 50k a year.
 

Dr. Courtney

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Seems like you ascribe your career woes to the subject of study.

That could be. But my experience is that folks with employment challenges with STEM degrees are often in that situation due to their mediocrity rather than their field of study and concentrations.

Be excellent in all you do, and the whole career thing will go better.

Forget "tailoring" that masters in Applied Physics and tailor that 4.0 GPA, several publications, and great recommendations.

Suck less.
 
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Seems like you ascribe your career woes to the subject of study.

That could be. But my experience is that folks with employment challenges with STEM degrees are often in that situation due to their mediocrity rather than their field of study and concentrations.

Be excellent in all you do, and the whole career thing will go better.

Forget "tailoring" that masters in Applied Physics and tailor that 4.0 GPA, several publications, and great recommendations.

Suck less.
I'm not blaming my subject (after all I am attempting to go further in that subject, aren't I). I admitted that I sucked during round 1. I am trying to not repeat my same mistakes during round 2.

Are you trying to say it won't matter if choose physics and engineering, or geophysics, or acoustics, as long as I have a 4.0 gpa, have great recommendations, and have published several papers?
 
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464
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Seems like you ascribe your career woes to the subject of study.

That could be. But my experience is that folks with employment challenges with STEM degrees are often in that situation due to their mediocrity rather than their field of study and concentrations.

Be excellent in all you do, and the whole career thing will go better.

Forget "tailoring" that masters in Applied Physics and tailor that 4.0 GPA, several publications, and great recommendations.

Suck less.
Do you publish papers in a Master's Degree Program?
 

gleem

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gleem

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I don't understand what Fig. 7 is saying. what do the percentages represent?
I would interpret it as the results of a survey in which respondents were asked to rank the benefits they received from a PSM program e.g., 39.7% said a PSM facilitated a career change.

I know little of data analytics except that it is growing field with a good employment outlook. WRT their program it is accredited by a recognized higher education body but more importantly for you it is also accredited by the National Professional Science Masters Association the body that oversee these programs nationally.

You should certainly look more deeply into the course of study because it is so vast to make sure that you choose wisely and end up doing something you like and can be excited about. Look at different programs and compare so that you can ask intelligent question about the program that you are interested in.
 
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I would interpret it as the results of a survey in which respondents were asked to rank the benefits they received from a PSM program e.g., 39.7% said a PSM facilitated a career change.



I know little of data analytics except that it is growing field with a good employment outlook. WRT their program it is accredited by a recognized higher education body but more importantly for you it is also accredited by the National Professional Science Masters Association the body that oversee these programs nationally.

You should certainly look more deeply into the course of study because it is so vast to make sure that you choose wisely and end up doing something you like and can be excited about. Look at different programs and compare so that you can ask intelligent question about the program that you are interested in.
thanks. you've given me much to think about :)
 

gleem

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@grandpa2390 If you can remember let us know how things work out for you. Maybe you can help others by sharing your experiences.
 
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@grandpa2390 If you can remember let us know how things work out for you. Maybe you can help others by sharing your experiences.
absolutely! I know a guy who works in data science, I told him of my interest and he has offered to advise me. :)
One thing I want to make sure of is that I enroll in a program that is rigorous and respected. :) I've done a bit of research on that particular school, and it doesn't get a lot of respect... So I'll keep looking.

as Dr Courtney told me in the past, having gone to a school in Louisiana hasn't done me much good as far as Academic Rigour is concerned.
 

CrysPhys

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OP: If you're planning on obtaining a terminal masters (not continuing on to a PhD) with the objective of enhancing your career opportunities, you should at least consider an MS engineering degree such as ME or EE and becoming a licensed professional engineer (PE). Those credentials have far more value in the job market than a Masters in Applied Physics.
 

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