How to Calculate the Bounces of a Bouncy Ball

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In summary, the conversation discusses the task of calculating the height of a bouncing ball using its mass, height, and gravity. The speaker acknowledges the need to consider other variables such as wind resistance and surface, but wishes to keep the equation simple. Suggestions are made to look up the coefficient of restitution and to conduct a physical experiment to gather data for the code.
  • #1
Homework Statement
If I were to say M was mass, H was height, and G was gravity, what equation could I plug those variables into to get how high and how many times a ball would bounce after being dropped.
Relevant Equations
Mass, Gravity, and Height of ball being dropped
For school I'm trying to write some code to calculate the height of how high a ball would bounce given its mass, height, and the gravity of where it was dropped. I know there are more variables to consider, like wind resistance and the surface it was dropped on, but for now I'm trying to keep it simple.
"If I were to say M was mass, H was height, and G was gravity, what equation could I plug those variables into to get how high and how many times a ball would bounce after being dropped."
Sorry if any of this seems unclear, I know almost nothing about physics but I need to figure this out for my computer science class.
 
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  • #2
Without additional assumptions the ball will bounce back to its original height indefinitely.
 
  • #3
Look up coefficient of restitution.
 
  • #4
Why not get yourself a bouncy ball, bounce it off the floor with some kind of scale behind it and take a video. You can estimate the maximum height after each bounce and then write the code to describe the motion. It's called data fitting. As a @harusex PF user @haruspex suggested, look up coefficient of restitution.
 
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  • #5
kuruman said:
As a @harusex
Something else on your mind?
 
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Likes berkeman
  • #6
haruspex said:
Something else on your mind?
Oooops, just one of them Freudian slips. :blushing:
 

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