How to depict a nuclear magnetic octupole

In summary, the illustrative drawing would use magnets to depict the electric and magnetic multipoles. The pear-like shape would be used to represent an octupole deformation, and the magnets would help to illustrate the alignment of the P-orbitals within the conglomerates.
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BillKet
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Hello! I am not sure if this is the best place for this question, but I want to make a simple illustrative drawing (for a presentation given to people both with and without physics knowledge) of a nuclear magnetic octupole moment. For example for a magnetic dipole I can use a magnet as a representation or for a quadrupole electric moment I can draw a rugby-ball like shape nucleus, but I am not sure what to use for a nuclear magnetic octupole moment. I saw people often use a pear shaped like nucleus for octupole deformations, but in this case it is not the deformation that is octupolar (or even the electric charge distribution), it is the magnetic field. Any advice about how can I easily (not necessarily super accurately) convey that image to a general audience? Thank you!
 
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The picture below (https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/916524) depicts electric multipoles (red = + charges, blue = - charges). But you could use it just as well for magnetic multipoles by labeling red=N-pole, blue=S-pole of 1, 2, or 4 identical bar magnets.
Public.jpg
 
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  • #3
The pear may not be perfect, but the collection of hard little balls (nucleons) with well-definied positions, momenta, and identities is even less perfect. Concentrate the presentation on the important issues.
 
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  • #4
BillKet said:
Hello! I am not sure if this is the best place for this question, but I want to make a simple illustrative drawing (for a presentation given to people both with and without physics knowledge) of a nuclear magnetic octupole moment. For example for a magnetic dipole I can use a magnet as a representation or for a quadrupole electric moment I can draw a rugby-ball like shape nucleus, but I am not sure what to use for a nuclear magnetic octupole moment. I saw people often use a pear shaped like nucleus for octupole deformations, but in this case it is not the deformation that is octupolar (or even the electric charge distribution), it is the magnetic field. Any advice about how can I easily (not necessarily super accurately) convey that image to a general audience? Thank you!
P-orbitals, most likely to align domains within conglomerates, ex. ferric metals introduced to strong magnetic fields. They become magnetic.
 

1. What is a nuclear magnetic octupole?

A nuclear magnetic octupole is a type of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon that occurs in certain nuclei with an odd mass number. It is characterized by a magnetic field that has an octupole shape, meaning it has eight poles instead of the usual two poles found in a magnetic dipole.

2. How is a nuclear magnetic octupole depicted?

A nuclear magnetic octupole is typically depicted using a three-dimensional vector plot, where the direction and strength of the magnetic field at different points around the nucleus are shown. This can also be represented using mathematical equations and diagrams.

3. What techniques are used to depict a nuclear magnetic octupole?

The most common technique used to depict a nuclear magnetic octupole is through computer simulations and modeling. This involves using mathematical equations and computer programs to create visual representations of the magnetic field. Other techniques include using NMR spectroscopy and imaging techniques.

4. How does a nuclear magnetic octupole differ from a magnetic dipole?

A nuclear magnetic octupole differs from a magnetic dipole in several ways. Firstly, a magnetic dipole has two poles while a nuclear magnetic octupole has eight poles. Additionally, a magnetic dipole has a symmetric magnetic field, while a nuclear magnetic octupole has an asymmetric magnetic field. Finally, the magnetic field of a nuclear magnetic octupole is much weaker than that of a magnetic dipole.

5. What is the significance of depicting a nuclear magnetic octupole?

Depicting a nuclear magnetic octupole is important for understanding the behavior of certain nuclei in NMR experiments. It can also provide valuable insights into the structure and properties of molecules and materials. Additionally, studying nuclear magnetic octupoles can lead to advancements in NMR technology and applications in various fields such as medicine, chemistry, and physics.

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