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How to find the binding energy of a photon?

  1. Mar 21, 2012 #1
    An X-ray photon of wavelength 0.940 nm strikes a surface. The emitted electron has a kinetic energy of 947 eV. What is the binding energy of the electron in kJ/mol?



    What I did:

    (947 eV)(1.602E-19 J)/1 eV = 1.52E-16 J


    (6.626E-34 J.s)(3.0E8 m/s)/.940 nm (10^-9m/1 nm) = 2.11E-16 J

    2.11E-16 J - 1.52E-14 J/1000 KJ/J/1 mol = 5.90E-20 Kj/mol


    Obviously, there is something terribly wrong here and my textbook is deemed useless at this point. PLEASE HELP!! Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 21, 2012 #2

    Redbelly98

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    Welcome to PF.
    You have found the binding energy in kJ for a single electron, not for one mole of electrons.
     
  4. Mar 21, 2012 #3
    Okay... so what am I missing? Avagadro's number maybe?
     
  5. Mar 22, 2012 #4

    Redbelly98

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    Yes.
     
  6. Mar 22, 2012 #5
    I solved it. I had to convert before doing the E-photon and E-released.
     
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