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I How to measure the surface area of an arbitrary 3D object

  1. Jul 30, 2018 #1
    I'm looking for an easy way to get the surface area of an arbitrary shaped 3D object. Getting the volume is easy by water displacement. What about area? Any neat tricks? We know different shapes can have the same volume and thus different surface areas so it's not a trivial problem. The purpose is for estimating surface area of 3D printed plastic parts which will undergo copper plating. Thanks!
     
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  3. Jul 30, 2018 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    Good question. Not so hard to do with lots of images and a clever computer algorithm, I guess. There are algorithms that will construct a surface Net of triangles from a digital 3D image - probably not a difficult bit of geometry.
    I can't think of an old fashioned analogue method that would give an accurate answer. Perhaps if you could invent a way of laying down a thin , uniform layer that would fit over the object, then find out the volume of material used. A uniform layer could perhaps be obtained by using interferometry
     
  4. Jul 30, 2018 #3
    Thanks. I'm hoping to hear of or figure out a method without computers or sophisticated devices. Your uniform layer could be wax by dipping and then weight it. One difficulty is the inside would follow the hills and valleys but the outside might be smoother thus getting an approximation of the surface area. Of course, I can just estimate the area but that's not as much fun. What would Archimedes do?
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2018
  5. Jul 30, 2018 #4

    anorlunda

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    The OP didn't say how accurate he needs to be. Just dunk it in paint, measure the amount of paint used. Compare that with dunking an object of known surface area.
     
  6. Jul 30, 2018 #5
    Accuracy should be one percent or so. I think that's close enough. Your paint idea idea Anorlunda is brilliant but I would need to act fast and not allow it to dry first. Or maybe, that won't matter. Thanks!
     
  7. Jul 30, 2018 #6

    anorlunda

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    You could also use oil instead of paint. The accuracy challenge comes if the coating is not uniform, say thicker at the bottom. That is why you want a viscous fluid with high surface tension.
     
  8. Jul 30, 2018 #7
    You could use strips of masking tape or food service film. Then, measure the tape or film. Alternatively, cut the tape or film into pieces of known area and fill in whatever gaps are left over and measure the oddball pieces. Just be careful to not stretch it.
     
  9. Jul 30, 2018 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    Dipping could result in non-uniform 'runs', which cause me to reject the idea initially. Perhaps dipping in a container full of small spheres (identical) could result in a uniform layer with only the edge effects at edges. Then it would just be 'quantisation error'.
     
  10. Jul 30, 2018 #9
    You don't need to measure the tape. Just weigh the part on a sensitive balance before and after, then weigh a known size piece of the tape.
     
  11. Jul 30, 2018 #10
    Yes, if one can tolerate lower resolution.
     
  12. Jul 30, 2018 #11
    Use an analytical balance with 0.1 milligram resolution. You will have your 1% error tolerance if you use at least 10 milligrams of tape to cover the object.
     
  13. Jul 30, 2018 #12

    anorlunda

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    How would you tape objects that look like these?

    7a37fb25fc6da9e90a739e7de288e041.jpg
     
  14. Jul 30, 2018 #13
    I wanted to reply with a picture of a 3D printed test device called a 'Benchy Boat' so you can all see the resolution and structure of a typical print we want to plate but I can't figure out how to add an image.
     
  15. Jul 30, 2018 #14

    anorlunda

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    There are two ways, (assuming you're using a web browser on a tablet or desktop, and not the PF mobile app.)
    1. If the image is on your own computer, use the UPLOAD button next to POST REPLY and PREVIEW. After upload, then a new thing appears on the bottom saying THUMNAIL or FULL IMAGE. Click FULL IMAGE.
    2. If you just have a URL for the image, click on the image icon (looks like a mountain range) on the editing toolbar. Then you can paste the URL.
    slask.png
     
  16. Jul 30, 2018 #15
    image.jpg
    Thanks! As can be seen, the surface isn't only on the 'outside'.
     
  17. Jul 31, 2018 #16

    sophiecentaur

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    If the object was produced on a 3D printer then the original data is the best source of information about its surface area.
    If you want to plate the object then I would imagine the plating thickness would vary quite a bit, according to the position of parts of the surface. Is it a conducting material or will you need to spray the model with a conductor first?
     
  18. Jul 31, 2018 #17

    Grinkle

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    What is the process for plating the parts?

    The suggestions seem to be along the lines of "plate the part with something easy to plate with" but if the practical application of this is to predict plating costs, maybe you just need to plate a part and see how much Cu it required. Looking at that boat, I imagine that viscous material won't easily wet the insides of the smaller geometries on the boat, and as already noted, non-viscous material won't be uniform in coverage.

    This is a very engaging problem, by the way. I hope we come to a practical answer!
     
  19. Jul 31, 2018 #18
    It's ABS plastic. We will have to apply conductive paint first. The paint could be used to estimate the surface area too. It's also true if the original data the printer printed from is available, the surface area should be retrieved. I'm assuming I won't always have that data available.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  20. Jul 31, 2018 #19
    Thanks. I'm using Copper Sulfate solution. I'm coating the ABS plastic with a conductive paint. I tried a homemade graphite layer but have no success yet as the resistance seemed too high, in the 240,000 Ohm range.
     
  21. Jul 31, 2018 #20
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