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How to solve sqrt(25) + sqrt(30)?

  1. Mar 8, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I'm a bit confused on how to add something like this [tex]\sqrt{}25[/tex]+[tex]\sqrt{}30[/tex]


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    I know this is an easy thing to do but im a little confused.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 8, 2009 #2
    Re: Radicals

    how else could you write root 25??
     
  4. Mar 8, 2009 #3
    Re: Radicals

    Oh i see. that wasnt a good example. how would you add [tex]\sqrt{}22[/tex]+[tex]\sqrt{}30[/tex] that is wa better example of what i am trying to say. somthing that is not a perfect square.
     
  5. Mar 8, 2009 #4

    Dick

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    Re: Radicals

    You can't really express it more simply than it already is. You could write sqrt(2)*(sqrt(11)+sqrt(15)). But that's not really much, if any, simpler.
     
  6. Mar 8, 2009 #5
    Re: Radicals

    this is a problem I am working on (1+[tex]\sqrt{}26[/tex])(3-2[tex]\sqrt{}23[/tex]
    i simplified it down to 2[tex]\sqrt{}26[/tex]*[tex]\sqrt{}23[/tex]
    if it was a normal problem without a number outside the radicals you would just take in both numbers inside a radical and multiply them but theres a 2 outside the radical of 26.
     
  7. Mar 8, 2009 #6

    Dick

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    Re: Radicals

    If you simplified (1+sqrt(26))*(3-2*sqrt(23)) down to 2*sqrt(26)*sqrt(23), you did it wrong. That's going to be ugly however you write it.
     
  8. Mar 8, 2009 #7
    Re: Radicals

    so you cant add the two up?
     
  9. Mar 8, 2009 #8

    Dick

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    Re: Radicals

    Not in any simple way, no.
     
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