How was this pronounced in 14th century native Spain?

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mesa
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Colon_zps48a27485.png
 

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  • #2
Pythagorean
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guess: cologne?
 
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  • #3
mesa
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That's what I thought...
 
  • #4
Pythagorean
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A pronunciation site I found pronounces it "cool loan". No idea what that would imply for 14th century, though....
 
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  • #5
mesa
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...no idea what that would imply for 14th century, though

It's Colombus/Colon Day :)
 
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  • #6
Vanadium 50
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Could this be a trick question? In the 14th Century there was no such place as "Spain". You had Castile, Aragon, Leon, Navarre, etc. Spain as a political unit didn't really exist until the late 15th century with the fall of Granada and the end of the Reconquista.
 
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  • #7
Astronuc
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Maybe 15th cent Spain, or rather what became Spain, would be a better context.

Isabella I (Spanish: Isabel I, Old Spanish: Ysabel I; 22 April 1451 – 26 November 1504), also known as Isabella the Catholic, was queen of Castile and León (Crown of Castile). She and her husband, Ferdinand II of Aragon, brought stability to the kingdoms that became the basis for the political unification of Spain under their grandson, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. . . . . Isabella and Ferdinand are known . . . . and for supporting and financing Christopher Columbus' 1492 voyage . . . .
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_I_of_Castile

So it's perhaps best to consider how the name was pronounced in Castilla y León.
 
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  • #8
mesa
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Could this be a trick question? In the 14th Century there was no such place as "Spain". You had Castile, Aragon, Leon, Navarre, etc. Spain as a political unit didn't really exist until the late 15th century with the fall of Granada and the end of the Reconquista.

May 15th cent Spain, or rather what became Spain, would be a better context.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_I_of_Castile

So it's perhaps best to consider what how the name was pronounced in Castilla y León.

Sorry, that should have read '15th century', don't drink and post kids...

The point was how 15th century Spanish pronounced 'Columbus' as being very similar to 'Colon', somewhat appropriate considering the kind of person he really was... and that's all ;)

Hope you all had a great Fall Break!
 
  • #9
jtbell
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I'm pretty sure Spanish-speaking people still call him Cristobal Colón, except when they're talking to English speakers in English.
 
  • #10
mesa
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I'm pretty sure Spanish-speaking people still call him Cristobal Colón, except when they're talking to English speakers in English.

Probably, the point being it was the people that knew him in the 15th century that first established him as 'Colon'. Don't look too deeply into this one guys, it's just simple humor and my kids thought was hilarious, I need to spend more time with adults...
 
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