Human in deep space in spacesuit, do they need a heater?

In summary, the conversation discusses the challenges of staying warm in space and the design complexities of space suits. It is mentioned that the main issue is actually staying cool rather than warm, and that spacesuits are typically not equipped with heating but rather cooling mechanisms. There is also a mention of Hamilton-Sundstrand, a company that used to make spacesuits but lost the contract to a smaller company. There is uncertainty about whether Hamilton-Sundstrand got the contract back or not.
  • #1
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Say I have a space suit that is heated only by the heat generated by my body and I am located in deep space where the only heat is from the microwave background. If I kept putting more and more of the best insulation around me will I stay warm? Is there a theoretical limit to how much I can minimize my energy loss?

Thanks for any help!
 
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  • #2
Unless you are naked in space, keeping warm isn't the problem, keeping cool is. If I did the math right, blackbody radiation of a 1 square meter object with good emissivity at body temp is about 480w. Including condensing the water we breathe, the human body needs to dissipate about 140w when doing light work (astronaut work is not that light). Throw on a pressure suit and it becomes tough to remove that heat. Thus, spacesuits aren't typically equipped with heat, they are just cooled.
 
  • #3
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  • #4
Nope. Hamilton got to play a bit part as a small Oceaneering subcontractor in exchange for dropping their protest.
 

Related to Human in deep space in spacesuit, do they need a heater?

1. How do astronauts stay warm in space?

Astronauts in space suits have heaters built into their suits to help regulate their body temperature. These heaters use electricity or chemicals to generate heat and keep the astronaut warm.

2. What is the temperature like in deep space?

In deep space, temperatures can range from extremely cold to extremely hot, depending on the location and the proximity to a heat source. The average temperature in deep space is around -455 degrees Fahrenheit.

3. Do astronauts need heaters in their spacesuits?

Yes, astronauts need heaters in their spacesuits to keep them warm and prevent hypothermia. The heaters are also essential for regulating the temperature of their life support systems, such as oxygen and water supply.

4. How do spacesuit heaters work?

Spacesuit heaters use electricity or chemicals to generate heat. The heat is then distributed through the suit's lining to keep the astronaut warm. Some spacesuits also have insulation layers to help retain heat.

5. Can spacesuit heaters malfunction?

Yes, spacesuit heaters can malfunction, just like any other technology. However, astronauts are trained to handle such situations and have backup systems in place. In the event of a heater failure, they can use emergency heat packs or return to the spacecraft for warmth.

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