Human-to-nature relationship is psychology

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zion
The one discipline that, sad to say, has hitherto remained virtually untouched by any concern for the environment or the human-to-nature relationship is psychology. You will search in vain in the texts and journals of any of the major schools of psychology—clinical, behaviorist, cognitive, physiological, humanistic or transpersonal—for any theory or research concerning the most basic fact of human existence: the fact of our relationship to the natural world of which we are a part.
Any thoughts on whether your relationship with nature is or should be a genuine concern?
 

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  • #2
Danger
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Welcome to PF, Zion.
I certainly can't speak for any of the others here.
My view is that my ancestors spent millions of years to put me at the top of the food chain, and I intend to remain there. The only pleasure that I derive from eating is in knowing that something died violently so that I could eat it. The perfect fast-food is a chainsaw and a cow... fire is optional.
I wouldn't consume a carrot until some idiot in California announced that plants were intelligent. And if I don't hear one of those little orange bastards scream pretty soon, they're off of my diet.
 
  • #3
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Freud wrote on that subject.
 
  • #4
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You wouldn't really expect most of psychology to try to tackle that one because psychology is very specific in what it studies, and it's almost all internal.

A few areas of psychology are focused on that though, evolutionary psychology, for example.
 
  • #5
Evo
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zion, I forgot to ban you the other day for spamming your website advertising
Sustainable Soul Coaching, Nature Deficit Disorder, Holistic Outdoor Counseling, etc... "Learn how to help nature recycle and heal wounded or polluted thoughts and feelings."
Sorry, we don't allow this kind of thing here.
 
  • #6
Danger
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zion, I forgot to ban you the other day

Don't ban him, dammit! Throw him on the BBQ; I'm hungry.
 
  • #7
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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

I assume since he's still here, that your giving him a second chance?
 
  • #8
Evo
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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

I assume since he's still here, that your giving him a second chance?
Time to line out his name?
 
  • #9
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Well, I'm all for second chances. I'm pretty sure I've had one or two over the years.
 
  • #10
Math Is Hard
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Well, I'm all for second chances. I'm pretty sure I've had one or two over the years.

Yes, but you had those GOOBF cards. I forget how you earned them.
 
  • #11
Danger
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It had something to do with copious amounts of chocolate that somehow slipped past the border guards.
 
  • #12
Lisa!
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They'd got engaged together! :wink:
 
  • #13
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Looks like hes been posting this same things in many forums.
 
  • #14
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Actually, I never got any GOOBF cards. :cry: I didn't need them because I got immunity from the engagement.
 
  • #15
Evo
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Actually, I never got any GOOBF cards. :cry: I didn't need them because I got immunity from the engagement.
Yep, you had unlimited immunity at one time, then you cheated on me. :devil: And just after I finished our matching his & her gowns. :cry:
 
  • #16
Math Is Hard
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And just after I finished our matching his & her gowns. :cry:
:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 
  • #17
Astronuc
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for any theory or research concerning the most basic fact of human existence: the fact of our relationship to the natural world of which we are a part.
Why would there need to be a theory or research. We are part of nature. There are those who exploit it, and there are those who care for it. There are university programs in forestry and wildlife management, etc. Why would there need to by a psychological study?

Any thoughts on whether your relationship with nature is or should be a genuine concern?
Why should it be a concern? Should I be concerned about being outside in the sun, or gardening, or managing the trees on my property?

I do organic gardening so that the fruit and vegetables are free of pesticides, which is beneficial to myself, my family, and the beneficial insects like bees, butterflies, preying mantisses, ladybugs, . . .

Right now in raspberry season, I manually remove Japanese beetles from the raspberries, blackberries and other plants. We also use beetle traps. I sure wish I could find a natural predator of Japanese beetles.
 
  • #18
Evo
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I sure wish I could find a natural predator of Japanese beetles.
Cats. All the cats here go after bugs. The strays just had kittens, how many do you want? Of course I can't guarantee what condition your plants will be in after the cats polish off the beetles. At least your beetle problem will be solved.
 
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  • #19
Astronuc
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I think Japanese beetles have a bad taste. I don't know of anything that goes after them - even cats.

Evo said:
The strays just had kittens, how many do you want?
So you're inundated with kittens - again?
 
  • #20
Evo
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I think Japanese beetles have a bad taste. I don't know of anything that goes after them - even cats.

So your inundated with kittens - again?
They don't eat them, they just catch them and play with them until they're dead. They do the same with wasps.
 
  • #21
Astronuc
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I'd need a herd of cats. :rofl:

And they'd probably trash the raspberry plants.
 
  • #22
Astronuc
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The one discipline that, sad to say, has hitherto remained virtually untouched by any concern for the environment or the human-to-nature relationship is psychology.
I'm still mulling over this statement.

When people go to national parks and enjoy the scenery and the wildlife, that involves the human-to-nature relationship. I'm quite sure that the field of psychology has studied to death the psychology of enjoyment. :rolleyes:

We also have bird feeders and enjoy the various birds that share our backyard, which is another good reason not to use pesticides.

We have a butterfly garden which attracts butterflies and a variety of bees.


How about land stewardship programs?
http://www.landstewardshipproject.org/

http://www.usccls.org/

http://www.csuchicoag.org/Majors_and_Options/Land_Stewardship/Land_Stewardship.asp

Even the Canadians have them.
http://www.landstewardship.org/home.asp [Broken]

There are many people who are concerned about nature and man's relationship to it!

I fail to see the need for psychologists to study the psychology of feeling concerned about Nature.

Maybe MIH can provide some insight.
 
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  • #23
Evo
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I'd need a herd of cats. :rofl:
One herd on it's way.
 

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