Human voice: Wavelength to frequency

In summary: I think that the frequency range was chosen for wired telephone communication because the lower range allows for longer distances than if the frequency range were higher. Raising the minimum frequency transmitted would increase the cost of the equipment, and lowering the maximum would decrease the range. There are potential disadvantages to both of those choices.
  • #1
wirefree
105
21
With reference to the formula:

distance (wavelength) = k / frequency

what does a wavelenght of 1176470.58 signify with regards to the fundamental frequency of a typical adult female being between 165 to 255 Hz, where

d = 300/.000255 = 1176470.58

Would greatly appreciate advise.


wirefree
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Where did you get those numbers and where did you get that equation?

Your equation is wrong because velocity is the product of wavelength and frequency. Your "k" is velocity.

If you take the speed of sound for a typical day to be 332 m/s and using an average frequency of 200 Hz, that equates to wavelength of 1.66 m.
 
  • #3
wirefree said:
With reference to the formula:

distance (wavelength) = k / frequency

what does a wavelenght of 1176470.58 signify with regards to the fundamental frequency of a typical adult female being between 165 to 255 Hz, where

d = 300/.000255 = 1176470.58

Would greatly appreciate advise.


wirefree

It signifies that you are using the speed of light instead of the speed of sound for k.
 
  • #4
Appreciate the advise.

I put forth a follow-up concluding query below:

Why do the usable voice frequency band in telephony range from approximately 300 Hz to 3400 Hz when the voiced speech of a typical adult human have a fundamental frequency from 85 to 255 Hz?

Look forward to your advise.


wirefree

P.S. My information source is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_frequency
 
  • #5
wirefree said:
Appreciate the advise.

I put forth a follow-up concluding query below:

Why do the usable voice frequency band in telephony range from approximately 300 Hz to 3400 Hz when the voiced speech of a typical adult human have a fundamental frequency from 85 to 255 Hz?

Look forward to your advise.


wirefree

P.S. My information source is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_frequency

Is this for homework or coursework? If so, we can move this thread for you to the Homework Help forums.

What are your thoughts about why the reduced frequency range was chosen for wired telephone communication? What advantages would there be to raising the minimum frequency transmitted, and lowering the maximum? Why didn't they narrow the frequency range even more?
 

Related to Human voice: Wavelength to frequency

1. What is the relationship between wavelength and frequency for the human voice?

The human voice is produced by sound waves, which have both a wavelength and a frequency. The wavelength is the distance between two consecutive peaks or troughs of a wave, while the frequency is the number of waves that pass a given point in a second. In the case of the human voice, the wavelength and frequency are inversely related. This means that as the wavelength decreases, the frequency increases, and vice versa.

2. How does the human ear perceive different wavelengths and frequencies of the human voice?

The human ear has a range of frequencies that it can perceive, with the average range being between 20 Hz and 20,000 Hz. However, different parts of the ear are sensitive to different frequencies. The outer ear is most sensitive to low frequencies, while the inner ear is most sensitive to high frequencies. This allows us to perceive the full range of frequencies in the human voice.

3. Can the wavelength and frequency of the human voice be manipulated?

Yes, the wavelength and frequency of the human voice can be manipulated in a few different ways. One common way is through vocal techniques, such as changing the tension of the vocal cords or altering the shape of the mouth and throat. Another way is through technology, such as using a microphone to amplify and alter the sound waves produced by the voice.

4. How does the pitch of the human voice relate to wavelength and frequency?

The pitch of the human voice is closely related to the frequency of the sound waves produced. Higher frequencies correspond to higher pitches, while lower frequencies correspond to lower pitches. This is why someone with a higher-pitched voice will have a higher frequency of sound waves being produced compared to someone with a lower-pitched voice.

5. Are there any differences in the wavelength and frequency of the human voice between genders?

Yes, there are some slight differences in the wavelength and frequency of the human voice between genders. On average, men tend to have longer vocal cords, resulting in a lower frequency of sound waves being produced. Women, on the other hand, tend to have shorter vocal cords, resulting in a higher frequency of sound waves being produced. This is why women typically have higher-pitched voices compared to men.

Similar threads

Replies
11
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
811
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
9K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
9
Views
4K
Back
Top