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Hunt for Lost Da Vinci Painting to Resume

  1. Jan 15, 2007 #1

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hunt for lost Leonardo Da Vinci painting to resume in Florence

    Well - a real mystery.

     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 19, 2007 #2
    Wow, I remember the draft of that piece. I didn't know he actually started on it. I hope they do find it and soon. And hopefully it will be in good condition.
     
  4. Mar 19, 2007 #3

    fuzzyfelt

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  5. Mar 19, 2007 #4
    I think what that article is missing is a look at how today's colloquial can take license to adjust how we refer to things of old. These days are different. Very different. If I were to say simply, "Leonardo, there would probably be confusion as to which- DiCaprio or da Vinci. And I'm not going to speak the name in its entirety every time I discuss him. There's nothing wrong with it because we still understand what's being communicated. This article sounds more like "look how knowledgeable I am on obscure historical facts!" than a meaningful attempt to address what Shelley thinks is a problem.
     
  6. Mar 19, 2007 #5

    baywax

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    From what I remember of my Art History Michealangelo and Da Vinci were working on the same wall, but opposing sides, each doing frescos of (edit) a battle scene. Da Vinci was using a lot of wax in a borrowed process of fresco and candles and a fire started that took both pieces out. All that remains are Da Vinci's silver point sketchs of the horses and men (plus details of helmets etc.) embroiled in a battle (sans DaVinci's tanks, helicopters and blunderbuses).

    Ah, here is an account of the two Italian masters working in the same space and the technique Da Vinci was using which, among other things, required a large fire be lit under the wall holding his fresco.

    http://www.lairweb.org.nz/leonardo/battle.html

    Here's a snippet.

     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2007
  7. Mar 20, 2007 #6

    fuzzyfelt

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    I’m not sure what you are saying, what does Shelley think is a problem?

    I had meant that it was interesting that the author of the article the thread is about quotes the art researcher referring to ‘Leonardo’, and does refer to the artist as ‘Leonardo’ early on, too, yet chooses also to refer to him as ‘Da Vinci’, somewhere in the middle, where greater clarification isn’t necessary.

    I don’t think it is important know these obscure historical facts in order to refer to someone in a traditionally correct manner. I linked to an article that discussed the amazement I felt about the way Astronuc’s link was written, and how wrong it sounded, and this article used obscure historical facts to explain why this was the case. Regardless of knowing historical facts, I’ve always felt it was a traditional mark of respect that the artist is referred to as ‘Leonardo’, where further clarification is unnecessary, and as ‘Leonardo da Vinci’ where needs be.

    I don’t think people need to know obscure facts to refer to ‘Michelangelo’ as such, and not always specifically ‘Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni’, or a shorter, ‘Buonarroti Simoni’, nor to refer to 'Raphael' as 'Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino' all the time, nor use a shortened term, ‘Da Urbino’, for just a couple of examples.

    That ‘Da Vinci’ has come to be understood to refer to Leonardo doesn’t mean it is correct. I find it odd that a journalist chose to disregard the experts he quoted, and his own words, for no clear reason.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2007
  8. Mar 20, 2007 #7
    From the article:
    "In The Da Vinci Code, Robert Langdon refers to Leonardo as "Da Vinci." Right away, beginning with this book's title, I began to squirm. If fictional Harvard professors like Robert Langdon – who certainly, being Harvard professors, should know better - were to begin calling the artist "Da Vinci," I feared there was little hope for the rest of us mere mortals. Sure enough, since the novel's publication one sees reporter after author after blogger referring to Leonardo as "Da Vinci.""

    I take her "squirm" reaction to mean she has a problem to how his name is used. I do agree with everything you wrote in this reply.
     
  9. Mar 20, 2007 #8

    fuzzyfelt

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    I was thinking of his Medusa! Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2007
  10. Mar 20, 2007 #9

    baywax

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    Whether the fresco is finished or not, the account I've linked to suggests that if the "cavity" is opened they'll find a kind of mushy, waxy mix of pigment and plaster with no recognisable image by Leonardo Da Vinci. The 52 foot high by 100 something ft wide fresco sunk like the Titanic about 600 years ago.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2007
  11. Mar 20, 2007 #10
    Ah, that's fine. You'll still be able sell it on eBay for $1,000,000.
     
  12. Mar 20, 2007 #11

    J77

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    Nice link -- but is it not speculation as to what happened, or am I missing something?

    On the other note, I see no reason not to say Da Vinci -- tho' the ninja turtle was Leonardo :tongue:

    Another note, I like Da Vinci -- my favourite is the sketch of The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist in the National Gallery -- and the painting of the Virgin on the Rocks isn't so bad either :smile: Plus was in Paris the other weekend, with not many people in the Louvre -- actaully had the chance to admire the Mona Lisa from close range :wink: (and see the Virgin's sister painting) Tho', Paris has turned into a DVC one-stop tourist-shop :biggrin:

    This is quite cool too: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/collection/news/newsitems/leonardo.htm

    Actually, I've also admired Da Vinci's tomb in Amboise -- I've turned into quite the pilgrim without knowing it :biggrin: :wink:
     
  13. Mar 20, 2007 #12

    baywax

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    I don't know the percentage of speculation and the percentage of actual recorded information in that article. The frescos Michealangelo and Da Vinci were working on at the same time (Michealangelo at 27 years old and Da Vinci at 53 with Rapheal popping his 21 year old head in once in a while to watch the Titans spar) were no doubt fully recorded in church and city official's records. The incidental failure of Da Vinci's fresco technique must have been recorded as well, probably against Da Vinci's wishes.:mad: What I'd like to study further is Da Vinci's implied use of chemicals that fix in light and the camera obscura and how these discoveries probably led to his (assumed) hoax "the Shroud of Turin" as well as the near perfect graduations of light and dark on the Mona Lisa which you were fortunate enough to view up close (through ten feet of glass).
     
  14. Mar 21, 2007 #13

    J77

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    :biggrin:

    They've updated the room somewhat -- the glass doesn't appear to be one foot deep -- it's embedded in a large artificial wall which you can walk behind. So if it doesn't have tardis like qualities, it's certinaly not 10 foot :wink: :smile:
     
  15. Mar 21, 2007 #14

    baywax

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    That's great. Wasn't there a bomb threat or attempt on the masterpiece that prompted the extra security?

    Here are some more facts about the "mysterious" Da Vinci fresco in question

    http://www.physorg.com/news4596.html
     
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