Hydrogen Fusion Engine: Steel Sphere & Sulfuric Acid

In summary, a thick steel hollow sphere with an inside radius of 20 cm can be filled with sulfuric acid and water, and then the oxygen ions can be removed. Giving the sphere a negative charge will cause the hydrogen ions to move to the surface of the inside sphere, while giving it a positive charge will cause the hydrogen ions to accelerate towards the center and fuse. However, according to Gauss's law, a charged hollow sphere has no electric field inside, so there will be no force on any charged particles inside the sphere.
  • #1
Bruce Haawkins
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Have a thick steel hollow sphere with a inside radius of 20 cm. Then fill it up with sulfuric acid and add water. Then remove the oxygen ions. then give the sphere a negative charge and all the hydrogen ions move to the surface of the inside sphere. then charge sphere positive and the hydrogen ions accelerate towards the center of the sphere and fuse.
 
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  • #2
Apart form other more specific reasons, EM (gauss law) tells you that a charged hollow sphere has no electric field inside. So you won't be able to neither attract or repel H ions.
 
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  • #3
Posted has been reminded to maintain a civil attitude in posts
Please do the maths before you speak the charged particle has not gotten an even amount of cancelling forces on it. The forces only cancel right at the center of the sphere.
 
  • #4
Bruce Haawkins said:
Please do the maths before you speak the charged particle has not gotten an even amount of cancelling forces on it. The forces only cancel right at the center of the sphere.
This is incorrect. As @dRic2 says, the electric field from a charged sphere is zero inside, and hence the force on a charge inside the sphere is zero. This is a standard result, the maths for which was done by Gauss over two centuries ago. See, for example, Wikipedia.
Wikipedia said:
We can use Gauss's law to find the magnitude of the resultant electric field E at a distance r from the center of the charged shell. It is immediately apparent that for a spherical Gaussian surface of radius r < R the enclosed charge is zero: hence the net flux is zero and the magnitude of the electric field on the Gaussian surface is also 0
 
  • #5
In addition to the other problems.

Bruce Haawkins said:
Then remove the oxygen ions.

How, exactly?

Bruce Haawkins said:
then give the sphere a negative charge

How much exactly?
 
  • #6
Because the thread is based on a misconception, it is now closed.
 

Related to Hydrogen Fusion Engine: Steel Sphere & Sulfuric Acid

1. What is a hydrogen fusion engine?

A hydrogen fusion engine is a type of engine that utilizes the fusion of hydrogen atoms to produce energy. This process is similar to what happens in the sun, where hydrogen atoms combine to form helium and release a large amount of energy.

2. How does a hydrogen fusion engine work?

A hydrogen fusion engine works by using a steel sphere filled with sulfuric acid as the fuel source. The acid is heated to extremely high temperatures, causing the hydrogen atoms to fuse together and release energy in the form of heat and light. This energy is then harnessed and used to power various systems.

3. What are the advantages of a hydrogen fusion engine?

One of the main advantages of a hydrogen fusion engine is that it produces a large amount of energy without emitting harmful pollutants or greenhouse gases. It also uses a relatively abundant fuel source, making it a more sustainable option compared to fossil fuels.

4. What are the challenges of developing a hydrogen fusion engine?

The main challenge in developing a hydrogen fusion engine is creating the conditions necessary for the fusion reaction to occur. This requires extremely high temperatures and pressures, which can be difficult and expensive to achieve and maintain. Additionally, the technology is still in its early stages and there are many technical and engineering challenges that need to be overcome.

5. When can we expect to see hydrogen fusion engines being used?

While there have been advancements in the development of hydrogen fusion engines, it is still a long way from being commercially available. It is estimated that it may take several decades before these engines are widely used, as more research and development is needed to make them safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

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