I have a couple of questions on archimedes' principle

In summary, the conversation discusses the mass, weight, and buoyant force of a 1 liter balloon filled with water in equilibrium in a container of water. The equations w = m*g and Archimedes' principle are mentioned as possible tools for calculating the weight and displacement of water by the balloon. The estimated values for the mass, weight, and buoyant force of the balloon are 1000 g, 9,800 N, and 9,800 N, respectively.
  • #1
Lexi2009
3
0
the question is:
consider that a balloon filled with 1 liter of water (1000 cm^3) in equilibrium in a container of water,
what is the mass of the liter of water?
what is the weight of the 1 liter of water?
what is the weight of water displaced by the balloon ?
what is the bouyant force on the balloon?

Are there any equations i can use for these four questions. i really don't understand how to do this without any equations...

Thank you!
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF.

There is w = m*g

Then there's Archimedes' principle.

So how much water is displaced by 1 liter of water?
 
  • #3
LowlyPion said:
Welcome to PF.

There is w = m*g

Then there's Archimedes' principle.

So how much water is displaced by 1 liter of water?

Thank you. so here is what i came up with...
a. 1000 g
b. 9,800 N
c. 9,800 N
d. 9,800 N

Any make sense?
 
  • #4
Eureka.
 
  • #5
okay thank you so much!
 

Related to I have a couple of questions on archimedes' principle

What is Archimedes' Principle?

Archimedes' Principle is a physical law that states that the upward buoyant force exerted on an object immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid.

Who was Archimedes and why is this principle named after him?

Archimedes was a Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer. He is credited with discovering and stating this principle, which is why it is named after him.

How does Archimedes' Principle apply to real-life situations?

Archimedes' Principle is applicable in various real-life situations, such as understanding the concept of buoyancy in ships and submarines, explaining why some objects float and others sink, and designing flotation devices for swimming and boating.

What are some examples of Archimedes' Principle in action?

Some examples of Archimedes' Principle in action include a ship floating in water, a helium balloon rising in air, and an ice cube floating in a glass of water.

How is Archimedes' Principle related to the density of an object?

Archimedes' Principle is directly related to the density of an object. An object with a higher density than the fluid it is immersed in will sink, while an object with a lower density will float. The principle explains that the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid, and this depends on the density of the object and the fluid.

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