If you break the laws of physics, do you go to jail?

In summary, the conversation revolves around the idea of breaking the laws of physics and whether one would go to jail for it. Although it is not possible to break the laws of physics, there is a humorous discussion about the consequences, including going back to school, being rejected for a patent, or even receiving a Nobel prize. Ultimately, it is concluded that in the rare case of actually breaking a law of physics, one may go to jail but also not go to jail simultaneously.
  • #1
Jupiter60
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If you break the laws of physics, do you go to jail?
 
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  • #2
Would that even be possible?
 
  • #3
StevieTNZ said:
Would that even be possible?
If it is not possible then the answer must be "yes".

And "no".
 
  • #4
No, but your patent application may be rejected.
 
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  • #5
jbriggs444 said:
If it is not possible then the answer must be "yes".

And "no".
So you do go to jail?
 
  • #6
Yes, we'll lock you up in a black hole
 
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  • #7
Jupiter60 said:
If you break the laws of physics, do you go to jail?
No, you go back to school. :smile:
 
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  • #8
Jupiter60 said:
If you break the laws of physics, do you go to jail?
Probably not, but Newton would be very annoyed with you.
 
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  • #9
StevieTNZ said:
So you do go to jail?

Yes. Go directly to jail. Do not collect 200 dollars.
 
  • #10
My dad went to jail. Tired of the banks collecting money from him, so he collected money from them.
 
  • #11
I thought, if you break a law of Physics, they gave you a Nobel prize.
But perhaps first you have to replace the one you broke?

Edit: With a new one I mean.

And it would be a funny sort of trial, with you trying to persuade people you really had broken the law, but the judges trying to prove you didn't!
 
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  • #12
StevieTNZ said:
So you do go to jail?
Yes. And no.

To explain the joke...

If you can never break the laws of physics then the set of cases where you do must be empty. In every such case you go to jail. And in every such case you don't.
 
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1. Can a person actually break the laws of physics?

No, the laws of physics are fundamental principles that govern the behavior of the universe. They cannot be broken or violated.

2. Are there any laws in place to punish someone for breaking the laws of physics?

No, there are no laws or punishments for breaking the laws of physics. These laws are simply descriptions of how the universe operates.

3. What does it mean to "break" the laws of physics?

Breaking the laws of physics would mean that something occurred that contradicts the established principles and theories in physics. However, this is not possible as the laws of physics have been extensively tested and verified.

4. Can breaking the laws of physics result in criminal charges?

No, breaking the laws of physics has no legal implications as these laws are not enforceable by any governing body. They are simply observations and explanations of natural phenomena.

5. Is it possible to go to jail for performing scientific experiments that seem to defy the laws of physics?

No, as long as the experiments are conducted safely and ethically, there are no legal consequences for performing experiments that challenge or expand our understanding of the laws of physics.

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