I'm looking for some general information on human acoustic perception

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  • Thread starter humanerror
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  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello everyone,

I'm trying to put together a computer program that will convert codes into sounds that can be quickly and accurately picked up by the human ear.

For instance, it needs to take "0048" and turn that into a sound, that will be different from "0049" or "1148", and a person needs to be able to hear that difference well enough to be able to write down the code they hear.

My question is for anyone who might have studied the physiology of human acoustics. Do you happen to know anywhere (preferably somewhere online, or an inexpensive book) where a layman could find information on what types/ranges of sounds are most easily heard and distinguished by the human ear?

I don't need anything specific to my application; just somewhere to start from so I can proceed with trial and error.

Thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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might look into audio compression. one technique they use is to remove sounds that they know the listener wouldnt notice anyway.
 
  • #3
lisab
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Hello everyone,

I'm trying to put together a computer program that will convert codes into sounds that can be quickly and accurately picked up by the human ear.

For instance, it needs to take "0048" and turn that into a sound, that will be different from "0049" or "1148", and a person needs to be able to hear that difference well enough to be able to write down the code they hear.

My question is for anyone who might have studied the physiology of human acoustics. Do you happen to know anywhere (preferably somewhere online, or an inexpensive book) where a layman could find information on what types/ranges of sounds are most easily heard and distinguished by the human ear?

I don't need anything specific to my application; just somewhere to start from so I can proceed with trial and error.

Thanks

Hmm...wouldn't a text-to-speech program do this? For example, "0048" would sound like "zero zero four eight."

Or am I not understanding what you're looking for?
 

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