I'm looking for some general information on human acoustic perception

In summary, the conversation discusses the need for a computer program that can convert codes into distinct sounds that can be easily distinguished and written down by a person. The speaker is seeking information on the types and ranges of sounds that are most easily heard and differentiated by the human ear. They are also considering using audio compression techniques and suggest looking into phoneme spectrogram for more information.
  • #1
Hello everyone,

I'm trying to put together a computer program that will convert codes into sounds that can be quickly and accurately picked up by the human ear.

For instance, it needs to take "0048" and turn that into a sound, that will be different from "0049" or "1148", and a person needs to be able to hear that difference well enough to be able to write down the code they hear.

My question is for anyone who might have studied the physiology of human acoustics. Do you happen to know anywhere (preferably somewhere online, or an inexpensive book) where a layman could find information on what types/ranges of sounds are most easily heard and distinguished by the human ear?

I don't need anything specific to my application; just somewhere to start from so I can proceed with trial and error.

Thanks
 
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  • #2
might look into audio compression. one technique they use is to remove sounds that they know the listener wouldn't notice anyway.
 
  • #3
humanerror said:
Hello everyone,

I'm trying to put together a computer program that will convert codes into sounds that can be quickly and accurately picked up by the human ear.

For instance, it needs to take "0048" and turn that into a sound, that will be different from "0049" or "1148", and a person needs to be able to hear that difference well enough to be able to write down the code they hear.

My question is for anyone who might have studied the physiology of human acoustics. Do you happen to know anywhere (preferably somewhere online, or an inexpensive book) where a layman could find information on what types/ranges of sounds are most easily heard and distinguished by the human ear?

I don't need anything specific to my application; just somewhere to start from so I can proceed with trial and error.

Thanks


Hmm...wouldn't a text-to-speech program do this? For example, "0048" would sound like "zero zero four eight."

Or am I not understanding what you're looking for?
 

1. What is human acoustic perception?

Human acoustic perception refers to the way in which humans interpret and process sound waves in their environment. It involves both the physical process of sound entering the ear and the psychological process of the brain interpreting and making sense of that sound.

2. How do humans perceive sound?

Humans perceive sound through the auditory system, which includes the ear and the brain. Sound waves enter the ear and travel through the ear canal to the eardrum, causing it to vibrate. These vibrations are then transmitted to the inner ear, where they are converted into electrical signals and sent to the brain. The brain then interprets these signals as sound.

3. What factors affect human acoustic perception?

Several factors can affect human acoustic perception, including the frequency and intensity of the sound, the location and distance of the sound source, and individual differences in hearing abilities. Environmental factors such as background noise and room acoustics can also impact how humans perceive sound.

4. How does human acoustic perception differ from other animals?

While the basic process of sound perception is similar in most animals, humans have a more developed auditory system that allows us to perceive a wider range of frequencies and intensities. We also have a higher level of cognitive processing and language abilities that allow us to interpret and communicate about sound in a more complex way than other animals.

5. How is human acoustic perception studied?

Human acoustic perception is studied through a combination of psychological and physiological research methods. Psychologists use experiments and surveys to study how humans perceive and interpret sound, while physiologists use tools such as brain imaging and electrophysiology to study the physical processes involved in sound perception. These studies help us better understand the mechanisms and factors that influence human acoustic perception.

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