Induced drag of ground effect-vehicle

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of model ground effect vehicles and how they fly close to the ground, causing a "100% ground effect" which eliminates airflow under the wing. The conversation then shifts to discussing how to calculate induced drag for a wing, disregarding other factors such as stability and tail/rudder. The question is raised about how to calculate the drag of a bump with no airflow underneath, and the analogy is made between an object moving in a static fluid and a static object in a moving fluid.
  • #1

Jurgen M

Model ground effect-vehicle shape like on picture fly above flat surface like floor sports hall or ice, wing end plates and trailing edge is so close to the ground(1mm) we can assume airlfow under the wing is zero and has stagnation pressure("100% ground effect").
How to calculate induced drag?

(Dont debate about stability,tail/rudder will fix this.I want analyze induced drag only for wing)
Untitledju.png


Here is some models
 
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  • #2
Jurgen M said:
How to calculate induced drag?
If there is no flow around the tip of the wing, then how can there be an induced drag ?
 
  • #3
How would you calculate the drag of a bump, of the same shape and size, on the same flat surface, which has actually no air flow under it? An object moving in a static fluid is the same as a static object within a moving fluid.
 

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