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Information field giving rise to quantum mechanics.

  1. May 14, 2012 #1
    "Information field" giving rise to quantum mechanics.

    Hello. I stumbled upon a video on youtube where quantum entanglement is discussed (). A woman quotes Einstein: "There is no place in this new kind of physics for the field and matter, for the field is the only reality." What did Einstein mean by "new kind of physics," and what field was he referring to? I am confused because the woman made it sound like Einstein believed that there is a universal "field" of non-locality where everything is instantaneously sharing information. If such an "information field" exists, it would have to exist beyond spacetime; instantaneous = time is irrelevant. Instantaneous communication between particles also implies that the concept of space is irrelevant. Also, the Pauli exclusion principle says that all electrons in the universe are "aware" of each other's quantum states. Could there be an "information field" permeating "reality" whose description is beyond the notions of space and time (instantaneous action directly implies that space and time are irrelevant)? Could this "field" solve the EPR paradox?

    Thank you in advance.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. May 16, 2012 #2
    Re: "Information field" giving rise to quantum mechanics.

    I have seen some complete nonsense about Einstein's Unified Field Theory on the History channel. They should have been ashamed of themselves.

    First, Einstein never got the theory to work, and he knew that. So in reality there is no such theory.

    Secondly, Einstein was 100% against the idea of anything going faster than light.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
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