Interesting concept -- pump, motor or both?

In summary, the conversation discusses a device that can potentially function as both a pump and a motor, but raises questions about its practicality and effectiveness compared to existing technologies. The design is complex and may have issues with sealing and reliability. The inventor may not have a thorough understanding of vane pumps and the device is still in the conceptual stage. Overall, the conversation highlights the potential pitfalls and limitations of novel inventions.
  • #1
Swamp Thing
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Not sure if it is meant to be a pump or a compressed air motor. Or maybe it can work as a pump or as a motor?
What would be the practical problems? Does it add anything to the prior art?



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Edit : Not sure how it will make a proper seal, with that step in the back plate.
 
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  • #2
As designed, it doesn't do any compression. It is a positive-displacement pump.

If one just moves the exhaust outlet to open and close a little bit later (say, opens where it is now closing and has a much-reduced duration and port size), the fluid would be compressed before discharging which would make it a much more efficient air compressor.
 
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  • #3
jack action said:
As designed, it doesn't do any compression. It is a positive-displacement pump.

If one just moves the exhaust outlet to open and close a little bit later (say, opens where it is now closing and has a much-reduced duration and port size), the fluid would be compressed before discharging which would make it a much more efficient air compressor.

At first I thought the whole arm was involved as a piston, which meant that a significant amount of compression would have been achieved. But later I realised that it's only the end pins riding in the groove that are the pistons. So yes, positive-displacement pump.
 
  • #4
Seems to me it will be completely impossible to seal the thing (red arrows) (*)
At the red circle there is a huge hole the designer has forgotten about
1678023847378.png


the 'arms' (2) are attached to 1 but slide in gutter 3, so the green dots at the outer ends of the arms are misleading (blue crosses).

(*) not to mention the arms against the front plate

##\ ##
 
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  • #5
The device rotor should spin counterclockwise, so the arms are thrown outwards, but then the flow is in the wrong direction to the arrows.
Clockwise rotation would push the arms into the outer wall, leading to rapid destruction.
The depression in the backing plate should be concentric with the rotor axis, it appears not to be.
 
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  • #6
OK, a nice thought experiment. But this is a reliability disaster, IMO. Too many moving parts, too many friction surfaces to seal as they wear, etc. This looks like an excessively complicated Wankel engine to me, and even they weren't great. Pistons work too. What's really the point? What's the advantage over conventional technologies?
 
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  • #7
DaveE said:
What's really the point?
It is a new idea, designed by someone without the handicap of practical experience with vane pumps. It exploits the Dunning-Kruger effect, to open up an entirely new field of possibilities. It will be worth a million dollars, once the experts solve the few remaining problems.

DaveE said:
What's the advantage over conventional technologies?
The irreality of the drawing demonstrates that the inventor is playing with a concept, without trying to understand the existing technology. Since it is only a concept, it has the advantage that, in the mind of the inventor, anything is possible.

Crazy inventions are fascinating because of their incompleteness and internal humorous contradictions. A very important part of wisdom, is knowing when to smile, and walk away.
 
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  • #8
Almost like a budding architect designing a staircase that is unintentionally Escherian.
 
  • #9
Turbo encabulator?
 
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