International schools for physics

In summary, quasar987 and mathlete are interested in finding the top universities in Canada and Europe for physics, specifically in fields such as theoretical physics, particle physics, astrophysics, and computational/mathematical physics. Some universities mentioned include Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, University of Waterloo, UCL, Manchester, Durham, Bristol, Warwick, Bath, and ICTP in Trieste. Funding for graduate studies abroad is available through EPSRC, and some universities may also have funding for PhD students.
  • #1
mathlete
151
0
I figured I might as well look outside the US... can anyone list the top 5-10 universities in Canada/Europe for physics? And maybe any disadvantages/advantages to doing so? The only ones I really know are Cambridge and Oxford, and outside of that I don't know about them :confused:
 
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  • #2
quasar987 is interested in this also.

But mathlete, when it comes to graduate studies, I would guess that the best is highly dependant on what you want to study. My uni for instance is specialized mostly in condensed matter and particles. It would be considered a good school for someone who aspire to study in these fields but not in say optics or string!
 
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  • #3
I am also interested in this topic, If I had to ask for specific fields for grad study in Physics, though I am only a freshmen I would have to lean towards the more theoretical and mathematical side, possibly in particle physics or astrophysics. Any ideas for Non US grad schools to look into?
 
  • #4
university of waterloo in ontario Canada is suppose to be a good school.

~Amy
 
  • #5
Like has been said...

You need to post your individual topic wants.
 
  • #6
Does anyone know international schools that are good for the more theoretical side, I am interested in Particle Physics, AstroPhysics, Cosmology, and Computational/Mathematical Physics
 
  • #7
For undergraduate physics in England the three most prestigious universities are probably Cambridge, Oxford and Imperial. Then there is a large group of other very good universities including UCL, Manchester, Durham, Bristol, Warwick and Bath.

I'm a first year undergraduate at Cambridge and I'm happy to answer any questions about the course (Natural science (physical)) or the university.
 
  • #8
You could get an idea of the staff quality from checking out the last RAE scores: http://www.hero.ac.uk/rae/rae_dynamic.cfm?myURL=http://195.194.167.103/Results/byuoa/uoa19.htm
 
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  • #9
What are the fees like for graduate studies abroad, I knwo in the US you can hopefully get a fellowship to TA or RA at the school you go to and thus tuituion is covered and you are paid a small stipend to use for rent and food stuffs. Is it the same in the UK? Would they do that for international students also or would it be limited to UK students, same questions apply for all school in Europe really. I am interested in the Graduate Physics programs in any european school and am generally interested in Theoretical Physics, Particle Physics, Mathematical/Comutational Physics and Astro Physics. Thanks for all the help, I will look into Cambridge Oxford and Imperial
 
  • #10
mgiddy911 said:
What are the fees like for graduate studies abroad, I knwo in the US you can hopefully get a fellowship to TA or RA at the school you go to and thus tuituion is covered and you are paid a small stipend to use for rent and food stuffs. Is it the same in the UK? Would they do that for international students also or would it be limited to UK students, same questions apply for all school in Europe really. I am interested in the Graduate Physics programs in any european school and am generally interested in Theoretical Physics, Particle Physics, Mathematical/Comutational Physics and Astro Physics. Thanks for all the help, I will look into Cambridge Oxford and Imperial
You need to look for studentships offered by the EPSRC - search www.jobs.ac.uk for projects - you'll get around 10k GBP tax-free per year + maybe about 3k from supervision of UG prolem classes etc. The department may also be able to fund you, if the uni has given them a resource to hire a PhD student.

In London you get a bit more but not enough to really make up for the high cost of living there.

Cambridge is a nice city - other places you might want to consider in the South are Bristol (has some good guys like Jon Keating) and Southampton (good research centres).

Basically, any advice you get is conjecture - you need to start looking around and contact people in the the departments.
 
  • #11
Thank you very much for all the information. I will begin doing some research into the schools and places you have listed. Does anyone have any info about schools in Ireland? I would love to go back there to study.
 
  • #12
I liked the ICTP in trieste, but it may be only for short term conferences.
 

Related to International schools for physics

1. What are the benefits of attending an international school for physics?

Attending an international school for physics can offer students a unique and diverse learning experience. These schools often have a diverse student body, allowing for exposure to different cultures and perspectives. Additionally, international schools for physics may offer advanced and specialized courses, access to state-of-the-art facilities, and opportunities for international research collaborations.

2. How do international schools for physics differ from traditional schools?

International schools for physics typically have a more globally focused curriculum and offer a wider variety of courses related to physics and other scientific fields. They may also have a larger emphasis on international research and collaboration opportunities, as well as a more diverse student body. Additionally, international schools may follow a different academic calendar and have a more rigorous admissions process.

3. Are international schools for physics more expensive than traditional schools?

It depends on the specific school and location. Some international schools for physics may have higher tuition fees due to their advanced facilities and specialized courses. However, there are also international schools that offer scholarships and financial aid to students, making it possible for students from varying economic backgrounds to attend.

4. What are the language requirements for attending an international school for physics?

Again, this may vary depending on the specific school. Some international schools for physics may have a language requirement for non-native speakers, while others may offer language courses to help students improve their language skills. It's important to research the language requirements of the specific school you are interested in attending.

5. What are the career opportunities for students who attend international schools for physics?

Attending an international school for physics can open up a variety of career opportunities for students. These may include positions in research, engineering, teaching, and more. Additionally, the diverse and global network of these schools can provide students with connections and opportunities for international job placements. Graduates of international schools for physics are also often highly sought after by top universities and companies around the world.

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