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Ionic liquid vs. solution

  1. Jun 20, 2017 #1
    Hi. I have a question about the term, "Ionic liquid"

    When I researched the papers, I found the word "Ionic liquid" in many papers.

    First, I thought the ionic liquid just means the solution that solvent is ionized.

    But as I read other papers, I found that people don't mean ionized solution as ionic liquid.

    For example... What is a difference between (1) NaCl ionic liquid and..... just a (2) solution that I pour NaCl powder in DI water and just it with stick ???


    I hope I find the answer here....

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 20, 2017 #2

    HAYAO

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    Gold Member

    There is no such thing as "NaCl ionic liquid*", but I know what you are trying to say.

    A terminologically incorrect* but intuitive analogy would be molten salt. Ionic liquid is like a molten salt except the melting temperature is below RT.



    *We usually refer to ionic liquid as salts that are liquid in RT. However, in a broader sense, molten salt is also considered an ionic liquid in some literature on ionic liquids. I am not sure if this is for sake of discussion in trying to let the readers intuitively understand, or if this term is technically correct under the definition.
     
  4. Jun 20, 2017 #3
    Thank you so much!
     
  5. Jun 20, 2017 #4
    First discovered true ionic liquid, by Walden in 1914, was ethylammonium nitrate.
    Is ethylammonium nitrate miscible with water?
    At which point does it cease to qualify as "ionic liquid"?
     
  6. Jun 20, 2017 #5

    HAYAO

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    Quick research says that it is miscible with water at any composition.

    I don't know the exact definition of "ionic liquid". In a broad sense, even molten salt is ionic liquid. The nomenclature "ionic liquid" seems to be something that many people take what other people says for granted, instead of trying to be very specific about it.
     
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