Is Artificial Gravity Created on the ISS Due to Tidal Locking?

In summary, the International Space Station revolves around its axis once per orbital revolution and is tidally locked. The spinning around its axis creates a small effect of artificial gravity, but most of the effects in the ISS environment are due to micro-gravity. The ISS uses TEA and active control methods to maintain its orbit and attitude, with gyros and propellant playing a key role. The orbit and attitude of the ISS are constantly monitored and adjusted to maintain a stable environment for its components and occupants.
  • #1
Myslius
120
5
When International Space Station is at rest, it revolves around it's axis once per orbital revolution (92.65 minutes). In other words, is tidally locked. Does the spinning around it's axis do create non-zero artificial gravity? Does it have non zero angular momentum?
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The environment in the ISS is described as "micro-gravity", which means that gravitational effects are roughly of the order of a millionth of the gravitational field of the Earth. These effects include tidal effects (the higher side experiences a slightly weaker gravitational field than the lower side), centrifugal effects (the higher side is accelerating around the orbit slightly faster than the lower side and gravitational effects due to the local masses of the station components and occupants. Most of these effects are larger the further from the middle of the station.

The relative effect of spinning around its own axis during an orbit is a small part of that. You should be able to calculate the acceleration from ##r \omega^2## where ##r## is the distance from the axis of the rotation and ##\omega## is the angular velocity (##2 \pi## radians per ##93 * 60## seconds).
 
  • #3
Myslius said:
In other words, is tidally locked.
A pointer. Not an actual answer to your question but since you mentioned,
Tidally locked is an effect of only gravity.

The ISS uses what is called TEA - Torque equilibrium Attitude - for its orbit.
Where the effects of gravity and drag from the atmosphere will tend to cancel each other out.

Better explanation here,
https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/orientation-of-satellites.420947/
( where else, at PF )

Active control comes from gyros and propellant,
http://www.boeing.com/assets/pdf/defense-space/space/spacestation/systems/docs/ISS%20Motion%20Control%20System.pdf

Some data on the orbit, attitude variation,
Section 3.2 Page 14
http://wsn.spaceflight.esa.int/docs/201107/Annex1-ESA-ISS-CC-AO-Climate-Change.pdf
 

Related to Is Artificial Gravity Created on the ISS Due to Tidal Locking?

1. How does artificial gravity work on the ISS?

Artificial gravity on the ISS is created through the use of centrifugal force. This force is generated by rotating the spacecraft, causing objects and occupants to experience a gravitational pull towards the outer rim of the rotating structure.

2. What are the benefits of having artificial gravity on the ISS?

The main benefit of artificial gravity on the ISS is that it can help mitigate the negative effects of microgravity on astronauts' bodies. This includes muscle and bone loss, changes in blood flow, and other health issues. Additionally, artificial gravity may also make certain tasks, such as eating and sleeping, easier for astronauts.

3. How is artificial gravity simulated on the ISS?

Currently, there are no dedicated facilities for creating artificial gravity on the ISS. However, some experiments and exercises have been conducted to study its effects. These include the use of a centrifuge module and devices that simulate the effects of gravity through resistance and vibration.

4. Can artificial gravity be used for long-term space missions?

While artificial gravity has shown potential for mitigating the effects of microgravity, it is not yet clear if it can be effectively implemented for long-term space missions. More research and testing is needed to determine its effectiveness and feasibility for extended periods of time.

5. Are there any risks associated with artificial gravity on the ISS?

One potential risk of artificial gravity on the ISS is motion sickness, as the rotating motion may cause discomfort for some individuals. Additionally, there are technical and logistical challenges in implementing artificial gravity, which must be carefully considered and addressed before it can be used on a larger scale.

Similar threads

  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
0
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
15
Views
2K
Replies
122
Views
9K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
19
Views
5K
Replies
159
Views
13K
Replies
47
Views
5K
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
19
Views
5K
Back
Top