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Is doing a dual masters worth it?

  1. Aug 20, 2015 #1
    I am currently finishing up my undergraduate degrees (in physics and mathematics) and would very much like to do a dual masters in engineering and physics (eventually going on to get my physics PhD). Is this feasible and/or worth it?
     
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  3. Aug 20, 2015 #2

    Choppy

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    What do you mean by a "dual masters" degree? And where are you interested in doing it?

    Are you talking about a degree that incorporates aspects of both disciplines or are you talking about two separate degrees?
     
  4. Aug 20, 2015 #3
    @Choppy I mean I am planning on obtaining two separate Master's degrees, one in electrical engineering and the other in nuclear physics. I am interested in doing it at wherever I may be able to do both degrees concurrently (if it is even possible to do such a thing anywhere), preferably MIT or a similar school. Afterwards, I plan on getting my PhD in nuclear physics.
     
  5. Aug 20, 2015 #4
    I would really just like to know if it is possible/worth it and/or if anyone has done it or something similar.
     
  6. Aug 20, 2015 #5
    Also, I should add: by the time I graduate, I will have had all the EE undergrad courses completed that are offered at my university. Unfortunately I do not have time to take any other engineering courses that would complete a minor in the field.
     
  7. Aug 20, 2015 #6

    Choppy

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    I don't see what the point would be in doing two master's degrees at the same time, but a lot can depend on the details. For example, if you're into two course-based master's degrees that would probably be fine. It would likely take you twice as long to finish that as it would a single degree and so it wouldn't make much of a difference - after about four years you would have two degrees whether you did them in serial or parallel. If you're thinking you can somehow squeeze twice as much work into your time as anyone else and complete such an objective early... well it's not impossible, but you should have a solid, evidence-based reason for believing that you could do something like that.

    If you're talking about thesis-based master's programs, that's a different ball of wax. You would likely have a difficult time convincing your supervisor that you should have multiple projects.

    And if your final goal is a PhD in nuclear physics, and since you're talking about US programs, it would seem to make more sense to just apply to nuclear physics PhD programs at the completion of your undergrad. If the EE master's is purely for employability purposes, it would make more sense to cross that bridge when you come to it. If you complete a PhD and feel that you need engineering-specific education to get a job doing what you want, that would be the appropriate time to re-train both because it would be based on the current market and in principle give you an up-to-date education.
     
  8. Aug 20, 2015 #7
    @Choppy That makes a lot of sense. I suppose there is not really an upshot to doing both, in some ways I just want to prove to myself that I can handle it. I appreciate the advice and think I will just go for the nuclear physics PhD program. I guess I do not know what I want just yet and am just evaluating all of my options.

    Thank you again.
     
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