Is it good etiquette for a student to write down his|her own notes?

In summary: It would be disrespectful if the student pretended to still be writing during the professor's proof.In summary, it would not be disrespectful for a student to write his or her own version of the theorem while the professor is in the middle of proving it on the board.
  • #1
Eclair_de_XII
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I apologize for the vagueness of the topic title. Allow me to clarify what I mean. Let's say a professor is explaining a theorem while proving it on the board. He is explaining this to a fairly small class; he would hypothetically know what every single student is at his or her desk. Suppose there is some student who begins to write (or finish) his own version of the theorem that the professor is in the middle of proving. Would it be disrespectful, because the professor might be made to feel slightly redundant? Is this the sort of behavior that should be avoided in a college classroom environment?
 
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  • #2
How would the professor know that the student wasn't just taking notes on what he (the professor) is saying? Do you plan on announcing it, like "Hey, prof, your proof is dumb. I'm going to do a better one" ? :smile:
 
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  • #3
phinds said:
How would the professor know that the student wasn't just taking notes on what he (the professor) is saying?
The student would finish writing his version of the proof first, and would be too careless to not pretend to still be writing while the proof on the board is still being written.
 
  • #4
Did someone notice/care?
 
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  • #5
I'm musing about the possibility that the professor might notice.
 
  • #6
I doubt the professor would notice, much less care.
 
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  • #7
vela said:
I doubt the professor would notice, much less care.
That works for me. Thanks.
 
  • #8
As a professor, even if I knew what the student was up to, I wouldn't mind and I would not consider it disrespectful. In fact I would be delighted to see a student not just passively following the lecture but actually getting ahead of it. I had such a student a long time ago. He approached me at the end of a lecture, after everybody else had left, and informed me very respectfully that I made a logical mistake in treating a proposition as if it were a necessary condition when I had only proved it was sufficient. He was correct of course in pointing out my sloppiness. I already knew that he was an exceptional student and his demeanor impressed me enough to appoint him "voice of my conscience." This meant that he had my permission to interrupt my lecture and correct me should he detect another such slip. Needless to say, he kept me on my toes for the rest of the semester.
 
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  • #9
I’ve also witnessed that sometimes, when bright students get ahead of the professor in lecture, they’ll use the extra time to formulate some really insightful questions that ultimately add value to the lecture experience for the entire class.
 
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  • #10
Probably not. However, it might be embarassing in the least, with various degrees of seriousness, if for example you asked questions, or brought to the attention (i.e. inentiononally or accidently misrepresented) the professor's teaching and presentation to other faculty or other authority.

I can imagine the professor's reaction to notes shown to him as ones he or she presented in class, when they presented no such thing.
 
  • #11
Eclair_de_XII said:
proving it on the board. He is explaining this to a fairly small class; he would hypothetically know what every single student is at his or her desk. Suppose there is some student who begins to write (or finish) his own version of the theorem that the professor is in the middle of proving. Would it be disrespectful, because the professor might be made to feel slightly redundant?
No. Professor either is not likely to notice or does not care.
 

Related to Is it good etiquette for a student to write down his|her own notes?

1. Is it good etiquette for a student to write down his/her own notes?

Yes, it is considered good etiquette for a student to write down their own notes. This shows responsibility and engagement in the material being taught.

2. Will writing down my own notes help me remember the material better?

Yes, research has shown that writing down your own notes can help with memory retention and understanding of the material. It also allows for personalization and organization of the notes.

3. Can I use someone else's notes instead of writing my own?

It is not recommended to solely rely on someone else's notes. Writing down your own notes allows for better understanding and retention of the material. However, using someone else's notes as a reference can be helpful in supplementing your own notes.

4. Is it okay to write down notes on a laptop or tablet instead of pen and paper?

This ultimately depends on personal preference and what works best for you. However, studies have shown that writing notes by hand can be more beneficial for memory retention and understanding of the material.

5. Should I write down everything the teacher says or just the important points?

It is important to find a balance between writing down everything and just the important points. Focus on writing down key concepts and main ideas, as well as any additional information that you may need to remember. This will help with organization and prevent overwhelming yourself with too much information.

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