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Is it possible to screw off the cap of an Argon/Oxygen-bottle?

  1. Aug 12, 2012 #1
    Maybe strange question, but I would like to use an Argon/Oxygen 20 L bottle to load with water, NaOH and Al to make hydrogen for a fuel cell project. So, to load this bottle I'm thinking of screwing off the cap, then put it back again. I can imagine this is very hard tighten. I would like to have around 150 bars of pressure.

    Of course I put safety first, and before I try anything, I'll get to know all the knowledge about this.

    Another option would be to generate hydrogen without pressure and then pump it in a bottle. I'm not sure what's safest yet.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 12, 2012 #2

    NascentOxygen

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    Hi Prometium. http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/5725/red5e5etimes5e5e45e5e25.gif [Broken]

    Let me know when you're about to try this, so I can leave town beforehand.

    Apart from the safety issues, will your fuel cell mind being fed hydrogen contaminated with caustic soda and aluminium salt?

    In any case, you'd need a metal tank with an inert inner coating, else the NaOH will start to dissolve the vessel or the valve and fittings.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  4. Aug 12, 2012 #3
    I have made some research and found that the type of generating in an Argon-tube isn't safe enough. According to what I know, Na is more reactive then Fe, so no reaction. This generating bottle was also supposed to only load pressure, then tanked over in another dry and clean bottle. If this generating bottle is below freezing point of water when it's about to load over to the next, I have problems believe that anything more than H2 comes over. But for safety, I quit this idea.

    I'm more into pumping H2 from atm. pressure with a high pressure compressor in an Argon/Oxygen bottle. What might be the risk? The H2 is pretty (totally?) inert at room temperature, and the bottle is probably affected by this loading as it would be from Argon/Oxygen. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Aug 12, 2012 #4
    Hydrogen is notorious for leaking through tiny gaps or even solid materials, causing material compatibility problems, and for violently exploding in a very wide range of concentrations. If you have to ask these questions, you probably shouldn't be messing with it.
     
  6. Aug 13, 2012 #5
    Could you just buy a cylinder of hydrogen?
     
  7. Aug 13, 2012 #6

    NascentOxygen

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    I can't comment on safe handling of gases, it's not my field. I did comment on what I saw as dangerous handling in case no one else did. Have you consulted with a nearby chem department to see how they buy hydrogen?
     
  8. Aug 13, 2012 #7

    CWatters

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