Is my calculation for work done correct?

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In summary, the conversation discusses calculating the work done by a uniformly changing force acting in the direction of an object's displacement. The equation A = Fs can be used to find the work done, and three methods are suggested for finding the average force: using the force vs. displacement equation and performing calculus, creating a graph and finding the area under it, or using the average force approach with the given formula.
  • #1
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Homework Statement


Force magnitude at the beginning of the road s = 12 m is F1 = 10 N , at the end of the road F2 = 46 N. The force is acting in object's displacement direction. Calculate work done by uniformly changing force.

Homework Equations


A = Fs

The Attempt at a Solution


A = Fs = (F2-F1)s = 432 J

Is it correct?
 
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  • #2
kaspis245 said:

Homework Statement


Force magnitude at the beginning of the road s = 12 m is F1 = 10 N , at the end of the road F2 = 46 N. The force is acting in object's displacement direction. Calculate work done by uniformly changing force.

Homework Equations


A = Fs

The Attempt at a Solution


A = Fs = (F2-F1)s = 432 J

Is it correct?
No.

You can write the force vs. displacement equation and do the calculus for the work done, or make a graph of the force-displacement and find the area under it, or , more easily since the force is uniformly changing with distance, try the average force approach when using your formula. Use all three methods if you want and compare results. Your approach is not correct.
 
  • #3
What about now:

b4td1v.jpg
 
  • #4
kaspis245 said:
What about now:
Looks Good!

b4td1v.jpg
 
  • #5


Based on the information provided, your calculation for work done appears to be correct. However, it would be helpful to include units in your final answer (i.e. 432 J). Additionally, it would be beneficial to show your work and explain your thought process in arriving at the solution. This will help to ensure that your calculation is accurate and can be easily understood and verified by others.
 

1. What is work in scientific terms?

In scientific terms, work is defined as the product of the force applied to an object and the distance that object moves in the direction of that force. It is typically measured in joules (J) and is a measure of the energy transferred to or from an object.

2. How do I calculate work?

The formula for calculating work is W = F * d, where W represents work, F represents force, and d represents distance. Make sure to use consistent units of measurement for accurate results.

3. What are some examples of work in everyday life?

Some examples of work in everyday life include pushing a shopping cart, lifting a book, and using a computer mouse. Anytime a force is applied to an object and that object moves in the direction of the force, work is being done.

4. What is the relationship between work and energy?

Work and energy are closely related, as work is a measure of the energy transferred to or from an object. The unit of work, joules, is also the unit of energy. In fact, the work-energy theorem states that the work done on an object is equal to the change in its kinetic energy.

5. How is work different from power?

While work is the measure of energy transferred to or from an object, power is a measure of how quickly that work is done. Power is calculated by dividing work by time, and is typically measured in watts (W). In other words, an object can do the same amount of work but have different levels of power depending on how quickly it is done.

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