Is Nanotechnology the Future of Physics Careers?

In summary, a professor at a university is doing very well in the nanotech field. There is still theoretical work done in nanotech and it is physics-based. You don't need to study biomedical nanotechnology if you don't want to.
  • #1
JT7
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Like most undergraduates in physics, I'm passionate about what I study and very much would like to have a career as a physicist. However, while I don't mind being poor, I don't want to have to struggle to get hired. I'm also really interested in theoretical work, but I have been admonished that such pursuits can be career-killers. However, I've been looking into nanotech (and other fields at the crossroads between chemistry and physics, like condensed matter physics and chemical physics), and it seems that there are some good research opportunities combining both laboratory and theoretical work. I wanted to know if a) that there's still theoretical work done in nanotech fields, and that it's not just fiddling in a lab, and b) that the theory behind nanotech is physics-based, and that I won't find myself having to study biology instead of quantum mechanics. Thanks.
 
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  • #2
JT7 said:
I wanted to know if a) that there's still theoretical work done in nanotech fields

Yes. There is a lot of work to be done. Try looking at some articles in nanotechnology realted journals.

JT7 said:
and that it's not just fiddling in a lab

Some jobs will involve working in a lab, some won't. It's up to you to chose what to apply for.

JT7 said:
b) that the theory behind nanotech is physics-based, and that I won't find myself having to study biology instead of quantum mechanics.

Well, are you interested in applications of nanotechnology? Biomedical areas are potentially a huge area of interest for nanoscience, so it is one option you could take. In order to research and progress the physics, you'll need an understanding of the contex in which the tech is to be used: this is where you would have to study further in something such as biology, chemistry or some engineering application. Since I started working in bioengineering I've found that the sciences blur together somewhat.
 
  • #3
That's the thing, I want to focus more on the physics on the nanoscale, rather than biomedical applications. I really don't mind studying chemistry, but would a PhD in phys and chem be enough to do theoretical research in nanotech?
 
  • #4
Well you don't need to study biomedical nanotechnology if you don't want to - I was just trying to make the point that in a research career such as this the sciences/engineering overlap, it isn't as simple as "I'm studying physics".

Have a look at the highlights collection on the IOP website:

http://www.iop.org/EJ/nano

They choose some of their favourite publications of the year, and break it down into what can be considered the specific subject area in the contents page.
 
  • #5
Oh I see, I see. Final question: is it common for people researching Nanotech to also conduct research in related fields, like, say, condensed matter physics or chemical physics?
 
  • #6
JT7 said:
condensed matter physics or chemical physics?

Yes. In certain applications you will need to understand things from areas like this, though caution with 'chemical physics' since it's more of an umbrella term than an actual subject. That which can be considered as chemical physics is a huge number of topics.
 
  • #7
A professor at my university was one of the first people to start studying nanoscience in the world. He has ove 75 papers published in the last 10 years. He is doing nothing but picking up in research speed. He just got off of sabatical and picked up a postdoc. He is extremely intelligent, I would almost consider him a p-chemist more than anything though. He loves physics but his nano stuff takes him into what I term chemistry more than anything. I guess not all chemistry, he works with magnetism, orbitals, and excited states more than anything. His stuff is way above my head but it really doesn't interest me either.
 

1. What is the relationship between Physics and Nanotechnology?

Physics and nanotechnology are closely related fields of study. Physics provides the fundamental principles and theories that explain the behavior of matter and energy at the nanoscale. Nanotechnology, on the other hand, is the application of these principles and theories to manipulate and control matter at the nanoscale to create new materials, devices, and systems with unique properties and functions.

2. How does nanotechnology impact our daily lives?

Nanotechnology has already made a significant impact on our daily lives in various ways. It has led to the development of new materials with improved properties, such as stronger and lighter construction materials, more efficient solar panels, and longer-lasting batteries. Nanotechnology has also contributed to advancements in medicine, such as targeted drug delivery systems and diagnostic tools. It has also revolutionized the electronics industry, leading to smaller and more powerful devices.

3. What are some potential risks associated with nanotechnology?

Like any emerging technology, nanotechnology has potential risks that need to be carefully considered. Some concerns include the potential toxicity of nanoparticles, environmental impact, and ethical considerations regarding the use of nanotechnology in areas such as military and surveillance. However, extensive research is being conducted to address these risks and ensure the safe and responsible use of nanotechnology.

4. Can nanotechnology be used to solve global challenges?

Yes, nanotechnology has the potential to address some of the world's most pressing challenges, such as clean energy, water scarcity, and healthcare. For example, nanotechnology can be used to develop more efficient and cost-effective solar panels, desalination membranes, and water purification systems. It can also lead to the creation of targeted drug delivery systems and diagnostic tools for more effective and personalized healthcare.

5. What are some current applications of nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is already being used in various industries, including electronics, medicine, construction, and energy. Some specific examples of current applications include nanosensors for detecting and monitoring pollutants, nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, and nanocomposites for stronger and lighter building materials. Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field, and we can expect to see more innovative applications in the future.

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