Is nondetection of SUSY @ Tev a problem low energy SUSY?

In summary, the Tevatron has not yet detected any multiple Higgs bosons or SUSY particles. With the current amount of data and energies reached, it is difficult to draw conclusions about the likelihood of SUSY as an explanation for Higgs stabilization. The continued non-observation of SUSY at Tevatron and the lack of proton decay observations may not impact the potential discovery of SUSY at the LHC. However, it would require significantly more data to rule out Standard Model Higgs and a longer operation time for Tevatron to potentially make significant progress in this area.

The non-observation of SUSY/Higgs at Tevatron & SUSY

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ensabah6
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Thus far Tevatron has not detected any multiple higgs bosons or any SUSY particles. If SUSY is the correct explanation for Higgs stabilization, given both the amount of data and energies reached, does this present a problem (i.e makes more unlikely) SUSY as an explanation for Higgs stabilization? Presumably it might be another couple of years before LHC has enough data to find either Higgs of SUSY during which Tevatron will continue to collect data.

Does the continued non-observation of SUSY at Tevatron, combined with no-observation of proton decay, make finding SUSY less likely to appear at LHC or it has no bearing on whether LHC will see SUSY?
 
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  • #2
"given both the amount of data and energies reached"

That amount is too small to make conclusions. Tevatron has ruled out squarks and gluinos up to 300-400 GeV. Constraints on neutralinos are substantially weaker. It would take several times the amount of data collected to rule out Standard Model Higgs.

I'm not sure how long we can expect Tevatron to continue operating. The Wikipedia article says that it will be shut down in 2010. I recall reading statements to the contrary. If there's enough money to keep it running as is through 2013, only then it will stand a chance to cut out a sizable chunk of SUSY parameter space.
 
  • #3


The non-detection of SUSY at Tevatron does not necessarily make it less likely to be found at the LHC. While it is true that the Tevatron has not observed any multiple Higgs bosons or SUSY particles, it is important to keep in mind that the LHC operates at much higher energies and has the potential to produce more data. Additionally, the LHC has already observed the Higgs boson, which is a key component of the Standard Model and also plays a role in theories of SUSY.

Furthermore, the fact that the Tevatron has not observed proton decay, which is also predicted by some SUSY models, does not necessarily make the existence of SUSY less likely. Proton decay is a rare event and its non-observation at the Tevatron could simply be due to the limited amount of data collected so far.

It is also worth noting that the search for SUSY is an ongoing process and the non-detection of it at the Tevatron does not rule out its existence. The LHC is still in the early stages of data collection and it is possible that it may observe SUSY particles in the future. Therefore, it is premature to say that the non-detection of SUSY at Tevatron makes it less likely to be found at the LHC.

In conclusion, while the non-detection of SUSY at Tevatron may be a challenge for theories of low energy SUSY, it does not necessarily make the existence of SUSY less likely. The LHC has the potential to provide more data and higher energies, which could lead to the discovery of SUSY. Therefore, we should continue to explore and analyze data from both the Tevatron and the LHC in order to fully understand the potential of SUSY as an explanation for Higgs stabilization.
 

Related to Is nondetection of SUSY @ Tev a problem low energy SUSY?

1. What is SUSY and why is it important in the field of physics?

SUSY (Supersymmetry) is a theoretical framework in particle physics that predicts the existence of a symmetry between elementary particles and their superpartner particles. It is important because it provides a solution to certain problems in the Standard Model of particle physics, such as the hierarchy problem and the unification of fundamental forces.

2. What is the TeV scale and why is it significant in relation to SUSY?

The TeV scale refers to energies on the order of a trillion electron volts (TeV). This is significant because it is the energy range at which SUSY particles are predicted to be observed, as they are expected to have masses in the range of a few hundred GeV to a few TeV.

3. Why is the nondetection of SUSY at the TeV scale considered a problem for low energy SUSY?

The nondetection of SUSY particles at the TeV scale goes against the initial predictions of the theory, and therefore raises questions about its validity. Additionally, low energy SUSY is a specific version of SUSY that proposes solutions to the hierarchy problem at lower energy scales, and the lack of evidence for SUSY at the TeV scale casts doubt on the viability of this version.

4. What are some possible explanations for the nondetection of SUSY at the TeV scale?

One possible explanation is that SUSY particles may have higher masses than initially predicted, making them harder to detect. Another explanation could be that the detection methods used may not be sensitive enough to detect these particles. It is also possible that SUSY does not exist at all.

5. How does the nondetection of SUSY at the TeV scale impact current research in the field of SUSY?

The nondetection of SUSY at the TeV scale has led to a reevaluation of the theory and has prompted researchers to explore alternative explanations for the problems it aims to solve. It has also motivated the development of new experiments and detection methods to search for SUSY particles at higher energy scales. Additionally, it has sparked discussions and debates within the scientific community about the validity of SUSY and its place in the current understanding of particle physics.

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