Is the least count constant for Vernier scale or variables?

In summary, the least count for a Vernier scale is a fixed value that represents the smallest measurement that can be taken with the scale. This value does not change for a specific Vernier scale, even if different examples may have different values. The small scale divisions on the Vernier scale correspond to these least count values, with each division representing a certain amount. The example provided shows that the least count for a Vernier scale can be 0.01 mm or 0.02 mm, depending on the specific case.
  • #1
Medicalboy
6
2

Homework Statement


Is the least count constant for Vernier scale like 0.1 mm or variables?

2. The attempt at a solution

If the main scale readings are 10 mm and the vernier scale readings are 9 mm, the least count is MSD/VSD = 9/10 = 0.9 So the least count is 0.1 mm for every count in the vernier scale
again if MSD is 50 mm and VSD is 49 mm, the least count is MSD/VSD = 0.98 So the least count is 0.2 for every count in the vernier scale
 
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  • #2
The least count stays fixed for a particular vernier, they are the little steps the vernier can take with measurements. Your examples have one vernier with a 0.01 mm least count and the other with an 0.02 mm least count (note the extra 0 you omitted). This will stay the same for all measurements with the verniers. It does not change, that is the way the vernier is designed. The small scale divisions on the vernier scale each represents these least count values like for the 0.02 mm least count one the divisions on the vernier scale will be 0.02 mm, next division 0.04 mm, then 0.06 mm, 0.08 mm then 0.10 mm, that is the vernier division with a 1 digit next to it and so forth.
 
  • #3
andrevdh said:
The least count stays fixed for a particular vernier, they are the little steps the vernier can take with measurements. Your examples have one vernier with a 0.01 mm least count and the other with an 0.02 mm least count (note the extra 0 you omitted). This will stay the same for all measurements with the verniers. It does not change, that is the way the vernier is designed. The small scale divisions on the vernier scale each represents these least count values like for the 0.02 mm least count one the divisions on the vernier scale will be 0.02 mm, next division 0.04 mm, then 0.06 mm, 0.08 mm then 0.10 mm, that is the vernier division with a 1 digit next to it and so forth.
As you said above 'The least count stays fixed for a particular Vernier'.
When the main scale division is 9mm and the vernier scale division is 10 mm, we get the least count 0.01 mm, on the other hand, for the same scale, when the main scale division is 49 mm and the vernier scale division is 50 mm, then we get the least count 0.02 mm.
So why do we get different least counts for the same vernier scale? Could you explain it, please?
 
  • #4
Those are 2 different cases, they do not apply to the same vernier, that is to my knowledge you find only one vernier scale on a particular caliper.
 
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1. What is the definition of least count constant for Vernier scale?

The least count constant for Vernier scale refers to the smallest value that can be measured using the scale. It is determined by the dimensions and markings on the scale, and is used to ensure accurate measurements.

2. How is the least count constant calculated for a Vernier scale?

The least count constant for a Vernier scale can be calculated by dividing the smallest unit on the main scale by the number of divisions on the Vernier scale. For example, if the smallest unit on the main scale is 1 mm and the Vernier scale has 10 divisions, then the least count constant would be 0.1 mm.

3. Is the least count constant the same for all Vernier scales?

No, the least count constant can vary depending on the design and dimensions of the Vernier scale. It is important to check the least count constant for each Vernier scale before using it for measurements.

4. How does the least count constant affect the accuracy of measurements?

The smaller the least count constant, the more accurate the measurements can be. This is because a smaller least count constant allows for more precise readings on the scale. Therefore, it is important to choose a Vernier scale with a suitable least count constant for the desired level of accuracy.

5. Can the least count constant change over time?

The least count constant for a Vernier scale remains constant as long as the scale is not damaged or worn out. However, if the scale is used frequently or exposed to harsh conditions, the least count constant may change, leading to less accurate measurements. It is important to regularly check and replace Vernier scales if necessary.

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