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Is the Planck Length a 3d area?

  1. Jul 6, 2014 #1
    If so, is 'its half' also not a real size of space?

    What I am asking is pretty much; what is the meaning of the notion of a 'smallest possible' 3d area? What is the meaning of that cusp between 2d and 3d?
    Almost like asking what is in between 1.999999999999(repeating) and 2.

    Must every 3d area, even the smallest, have some greater than 0 value of length,width and depth? Therefore must those values of length, width and depth be dividable further?

    I think the answer might have to do with the planck length not being a quantitative and qualitative area of 'a pure space of absolute nothing' but a quantitative and qualitative area of common denomination related to the substantial nature of fundamental quanta, but im not sure.

    And I realize the notion of size is different than the notion of mass, though when getting down to the smallest sized levels I think there might be a relation, that is to say; at some point matter can only be dissected so many times, and this perhaps is the idea of fundamental minute quanta that are the smallest possible building blocks of the universe. Is it possible the smallest sized of which happens to be the massless photon?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 6, 2014 #2

    UltrafastPED

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    Planck length is merely an idea; it's what you get when you follow Max Planck's system of "natural" units.

    If you want to learn about "what may be underneath the hood" of spacetime you will need to investigate string theory or quantum loop gravity.

    See http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/planck/node2.html
     
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