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Is there a reaction called nucleus reaction?

  1. Apr 14, 2008 #1
    is there a reaction called nucleus reaction???

    my question is can we have reaction that has only the nucleus by separating the electron cloud and why we have in nuclear reaction most of the time reactions have the elecron in it and if we take the nucleus alone there will be no reactions having any electron under the theory there no electron in the nucleus and thank you.....
     
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  3. Apr 14, 2008 #2

    malawi_glenn

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    please writer shorter and clearer sentences. I have not understand any of your postings in this forum.

    Just so that I know how I should answer, how much Nuclear Physics have you studied?

    Do you know of any experiment where electron interference causes so much disturbance that we can't get good resolution enough concerning properties of the nuclei?
     
  4. Apr 14, 2008 #3
    my question is why we are not having only nucleus reactions ((( P and N )) without electron,

    because nuclear physics is concerned with the nucleus only is that correct.
    why are we putting the electron in middle is that because nuclear physics deal with the elementary particles.


    and i can say about my slef that i am in advanced nuclear physics
     
  5. Apr 14, 2008 #4

    malawi_glenn

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    "why are we putting the electron in middle is that because nuclear physics deal with the elementary particles"

    That sentence makes me doubt that you are in the field of advance nuclear physics..
     
  6. Apr 14, 2008 #5
    the meaning is can not we deal only with N AND P AND what is inside the nucleus!!!
     
  7. Apr 14, 2008 #6

    malawi_glenn

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    How can I know what you mean? You wrote that nuclear physics deal with elementary particles. Neither the proton nor the proton is an elementary particle, however - the electron is an elementary particle.

    What kind of interference could the electron could give rise to? We can also derive those interferences and substract them, not so difficult, electrons are relative simple objects.

    And what kind of nuclear experiments do you know of that electron interference causes problems? And also, heavy ion facilities exists, so don't worry so much :-)

    /malawi
     
  8. Apr 14, 2008 #7
    Primary cosmic rays are 'naked' nuclei I believe (they are mostly protons, but heavy nuclei are found too.)

    Naked nuclei should indeed sometimes behave differently from those accompanied by electrons. In an atom with a heavy, highly-charged nucleus the total binding energy of the electrons is very considerable, of the order of 1 Mev. These electrons include some that spend time near or even partly within the nucleus. They therefore counteract the mutual repulsion of the protons and stabilise the positive charge of the nucleus.

    Consequently, there must be nuclei which while stable as part of atoms, would not be as naked nuclei because there are no electrons to stabilise the positive charge.

    Some light nuclei that normally decay by electron-capture may be stable when naked. Electron-capture involves the production of an almost massless neutrino, and as the electron is captured its mass contributes to the decay energy. In beta+ decay you must have the energy available to make the positron (0.5Mev).

    Therefore some nuclei that normally decay by electron-capture are stable to beta+ decay and therefore stable when naked. I believe Be-7 may be an example.
     
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