Is there gravity at small scales?

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In summary, "small scales" in relation to gravity refers to the study of the effects of gravity at a microscopic level, and there is a difference in the strength of gravity between small and larger scales due to the influence of mass and energy. Gravity can be observed at small scales, but its effects may be less noticeable. It is thought to interact with other fundamental forces through the exchange of particles, and there are various theories attempting to explain it at small scales, such as quantum gravity and string theory. However, these theories are still under development and have yet to be fully confirmed through experimental evidence.
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petm1
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Is there any net gravitational attraction within a Plancks length, at that small of a distance all the mass of the universe appears to be outside?
 
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I am eagerly waiting for someone to post references of an experiment performed at these length scales.
 
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Hi.

petm1 said:
Is there any net gravitational attraction within a Plancks length, at that small of a distance all the mass of the universe appears to be outside?

If we are just a Planck length away from a particle, we feel tremendous gravity force from it, don't we?

Regards.
 
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Related to Is there gravity at small scales?

1. What is meant by "small scales" in relation to gravity?

"Small scales" in relation to gravity refers to the study of the effects of gravity at a microscopic level, such as within atoms and subatomic particles. This is in contrast to the study of gravity at a macroscopic level, such as between planets and stars.

2. Is there a difference in the strength of gravity at small scales compared to larger scales?

Yes, there is a difference in the strength of gravity at small scales compared to larger scales. According to the theory of relativity, gravity is a curvature of space-time caused by the presence of mass. At small scales, the effects of gravity are influenced by the mass and energy of individual particles, whereas at larger scales, the combined mass of objects has a greater influence on the curvature of space-time.

3. Can gravity be observed at small scales?

Yes, gravity can be observed at small scales. This has been demonstrated through experiments involving subatomic particles, such as the detection of gravitational waves from the collision of black holes. However, the effects of gravity at small scales may be less noticeable compared to larger scales due to the small masses involved.

4. How does gravity interact with other fundamental forces at small scales?

At small scales, gravity is thought to interact with other fundamental forces, such as electromagnetism and the strong and weak nuclear forces, through the exchange of particles called gravitons. However, the exact nature of this interaction is not fully understood and is an active area of research in theoretical physics.

5. Are there any theories that attempt to explain gravity at small scales?

Yes, there are various theories that attempt to explain gravity at small scales, such as quantum gravity theories and string theory. These theories seek to reconcile the principles of quantum mechanics with the theory of relativity, which governs gravity at larger scales. However, these theories are still under development and have yet to be fully confirmed through experimental evidence.

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