Is this properties of metal chart correct?

In summary, the conversation discussed a chart created to understand the properties of metals for a realistic RPG combat system. The chart included information on stress-strain curves, elasticity, toughness, brittleness, hardness, and ductility. It was mentioned that the game may not cover all exceptions and interplay between properties. There was also a suggestion to include the amount of plastic strain at fracture as a measure of ductility on the chart. It was unclear what the purpose of including malleability in addition to ductility was.
  • #1
Stradigos
9
0
Hey everyone,

In the process of wrapping my mind around the properties of metals for a realistic rpg combat system I'm working on, I made the following chart. Let me know what you think, if it's right (arrows pointing the right direction, covering the region, labeled correctly, etc), and if there's anything glaring missing.

http://michaeldeforge.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/stress-strain-propertiesofmetal.png
 
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  • #2
If I'm reading this correctly then it's generally correct, of course there are exceptions and more interplay between some of these properties. For example more ductile materials usually have a lower stiffness as well (though not always.)
 
  • #3
Good to know. Yeah, it's dumb downed considerably, but that's kind of the point. Taking this into account for a game is already more than 99% of games to already, so I had to generalize at some point.
 
  • #4
Yeah of course. Just covering my a## in case someone comes along and starts pointing out all the instances that deviate from the norm.

Let us know when the game is developed!
 
  • #5
I'm not sure exactly what this diagram is supposed to convey.

On a generalised stress-strain curve, the slope in the elastic region is the elastic modulus, a measure of stiffness.

The area under the curve would be an indication of toughness, bearing in mind that stress strain curves are normally measured at strain rates considerably lower than toughness tests.

In its purest sense, brittleness is fracture that occurs in the elastic zone. That said, materials that are considered brittle often exhibit limited plastic characteristics. As you are probably aware, there is such a thing as a ductile to brittle transition temperature where fracture is part brittle, part ductile.

The inverse relationship between hardness and stiffness is not hard and fast. Hardness can be dramatically increased by the presence of a second phase with little effect on elastic modulus.

A more useful measure of ductility on this diagram would be the amount of plastic strain at fracture ie on the x-axis.

Unless there is a specific reason for including malleability in addition to ductility, I would leave it out but, as I said at the beginning, I am not sure what this diagram is supposed to convey.
 

Related to Is this properties of metal chart correct?

1. What is the purpose of a properties of metal chart?

A properties of metal chart is used to visually display the physical and chemical properties of different types of metals. This can help scientists and engineers understand the characteristics of different metals and determine which ones are suitable for specific applications.

2. How is the information on a properties of metal chart determined?

The information on a properties of metal chart is determined through extensive research and testing in laboratories. Scientists use various methods such as spectroscopy, tensile testing, and thermal analysis to gather data on the properties of metals.

3. Can the information on a properties of metal chart vary?

Yes, the information on a properties of metal chart can vary depending on the source and the specific testing methods used. It is important to verify the source and methodology of the chart to ensure its accuracy and reliability.

4. What are the key properties typically included on a properties of metal chart?

Some key properties that are typically included on a properties of metal chart are density, melting point, boiling point, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and tensile strength. Other properties such as corrosion resistance, magnetic properties, and hardness may also be included.

5. How can a properties of metal chart be used in practical applications?

A properties of metal chart can be used in practical applications such as material selection for construction or manufacturing processes. It can also be used for comparing the properties of different metals and determining which one is best suited for a specific use, such as in the aerospace or automotive industries.

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