Learning about condensed matter physics as a particle physicist

In summary, the speaker is a first year master's student in nuclear and particle physics who took a course in physics of semiconductors but is unsure if it will be useful as their main focus is particle physics. They had considered taking a course in superfluidity and superconductivity, but are now questioning if it would be a waste of time. Their original goal was to have the option of finding work outside of particle physics, but they are starting to doubt if their knowledge in these areas would be beneficial. They have seen other particle physics students find industry jobs without extensive knowledge in condensed matter physics, and believe that problem-solving skills are more valuable. However, subject knowledge may be important for pursuing an academic career.
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I am on my first year of my master's degree in nuclear and particle physics, and right now i am ending my first semester, where i decided to take a course in physics of semiconductors. As i end this semester i start to wonder if there was any use in learning about this subject, as it seems like any type of work in this field would require a lot more learning about this subject and in condensed matter physics in general.

Learning that, i do not intend to do it as my main focus is particle physics, not condensed matter physics. And for the next semester i initially thought about taking a course in superfluidity and superconductivity, but i am afraid that it will just be a waste of time.

My goal was to learn about these subjects so that i could have the option of finding work outside of particle physics, but i am starting to wonder if all that knowledge will go to waste because any type of work in these field (in industry or academic research) would require me to pretty much become a condensed matter phycisist. Am i right on this or could i actually find a work, problably in the industry, where this "basic" knowledge would be usefull?
 
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As a particle physicist I have seen many students end up in industry jobs without doing any condensed matter physics apart from the basic courses. The main skill you learn that will be attractive to industry employers will not be your subject knowledge but your skills in tackling difficult problems. Of course, there may be jobs where a subject knowledge may be beneficial, but in my experience that is much more relevant if you wish to pursue an academic carreer.
 
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