Light - Angle of Deviation and Lenses

In summary, Homework 1 had the student trying to calculate the angle of deviation at a glass air interface. Homework 2 asks the student to use either the ray tracing or the formula method to determine the magnification of an object placed under a microscope. Neither problem had the student having any clue as to where to start.
  • #1
sinners
5
0
Hey guys, i have two question that me and a couple of my mates couldn't figure out for the life of us in class so i bring them here. The first one at first glance seemed fairly easy

Homework Statement



Calculate the angle of deviation at a glass air interface for an angle of incidence of 65 degrees and refractive index of glass at 1.55

Homework Equations



n1 * sin ( incidence angle ) = n2 * sin ( refractive angle )

The Attempt at a Solution





1.55 * sin (65 ) = 1 * sin(x)

1.40 = sin(x)

sin-1(1.40) = x

BUT WAIT you can't do sin inverse of a number higher than 1 so can some one please help me


The Second problem we didn't have the slightest clue as to where to start.

2.Use the ray tracing or the formula method to determine the magnification of an object placed under the following two-lens microscope. The object is placed 5.2mm from an objective lens of focal length 5.0mm.They eye-piece lens has a focal length of 40mm. The poles of the lenses are 150mm apart.

Please Help Thanks Sinners
 
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  • #2
Are you going from air to glass or from glass to air? You may have n1 and n2 flipped around. If it's glass to air, then you may be dealing with total internal reflection and there is no emerging beam.
 
  • #3
well in the textbook it says from a glass-air interface so i assumed it was from glass to air.
 
  • #4
sorry to bump but this is due tomorrow

thanks sinners
 
  • #5
As you've said, there is no solution glass to air. Try air to glass. What are you asking about?
 
  • #6
i tried air to glass and got an angle of deviation to be 30 degrees however in the book the answer is 19 degrees. Also any help on the second question?
 
  • #7
I get the angle of refraction to be ~35.8 degrees. Is that what you got? But now it's semantics. They didn't ask for the angle of refraction, they asked for the angle of deviation. I would call that 65-35.8. But that gives me about 29.2. So if the book answer is 19, I don't know. Second one, don't know. I've always hated lens problems, sorry.
 

Related to Light - Angle of Deviation and Lenses

1. What is the angle of deviation?

The angle of deviation is the amount by which a ray of light is bent or refracted when it passes through a medium, such as a lens or prism. It is measured by the angle between the incident ray and the emergent ray.

2. How is the angle of deviation affected by the angle of incidence?

The angle of deviation is directly proportional to the angle of incidence. This means that as the angle of incidence increases, the angle of deviation also increases.

3. What is the relationship between the angle of deviation and the refractive index of a medium?

The angle of deviation is inversely proportional to the refractive index of a medium. This means that as the refractive index increases, the angle of deviation decreases.

4. How do lenses affect the angle of deviation?

Lenses can either converge or diverge light, which can affect the angle of deviation. Convex lenses (or converging lenses) cause light rays to converge, which can decrease the angle of deviation. Concave lenses (or diverging lenses) cause light rays to diverge, which can increase the angle of deviation.

5. Can the angle of deviation be greater than 90 degrees?

No, the angle of deviation cannot be greater than 90 degrees. This is because the incident ray and the emergent ray cannot be on opposite sides of the normal (the line perpendicular to the surface of the medium) at the same time. Therefore, the maximum angle of deviation is 90 degrees.

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