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Literacy Falls for Graduates From College, Testing Finds

  1. Dec 18, 2005 #1

    Astronuc

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    This is troubling, since the state and federal governements like to tout their successes in education.

    NY Times, Dec 16, 2005
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2005
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  3. Dec 18, 2005 #2

    honestrosewater

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    And the content of what people read or watch on television or the internet is irrelevant? If that isn't what he meant to say, I think they should correct it. And if it is what he meant to say, I'd sure like to hear the explanation. Sheesh, people can use television and the internet to improve their literacy. I wonder if they published a copy of that article on the internet. :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2005
  4. Dec 18, 2005 #3

    Astronuc

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    I think Whitehurst was thinking of 'reality TV' or sitcoms like 'Friends', rather than 'The Discovery Channel', 'National Geographic channel', or 'History Channel'. It does seem to be a gross generalization to simply blame falling literacy rates on TV and internet.

    On the other hand, if people do not read, they will not improve ready comprehension.
     
  5. Dec 19, 2005 #4

    Bystander

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    Troubling? Yes.

    "... since the state and federal governements like to tout their successes in education." Most govt. "successes" are claimed for public schools --- college and university level education is funded to various degrees by fed. and state govts., but "accreditation" and rankings are "internally" generated by the "academic community." Even more bothersome.

    "Credentials" have become a commodity in this country, and to an extent, globally; colleges and universities deal in these commodities for large cash rewards, and quality control went out the window long ago --- once administrators realized that flunking kids out cuts off the cash flow, the underwater basket weaving courses were added, the "Xyz Studies" majors (sociology and anthropology for the innumerate) were recognized, and campuses turned into giant day care centers.
     
  6. Dec 20, 2005 #5

    jim mcnamara

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    40 years ago, the graduate school I attended required reading proficiency in two foreign languages for the PhD degree - by passing fairly tough ETS exams. My department required me to pass German because at that time a lot of Botanical Literature was still in German.

    All foreign language requirements were removed in 1980.

    The dumbing down of curricula in the US is not new. My father took the equivalent of freshman analysis in the second year of high school in 1922....in New York City public schools. I still have his report card - B+. He also took Latin and Greek that year. He didn't get a B+ in those subjects. :D

    The public schools here in New Mexico only offer AP calc to "acheivers", and then only as a 12th grader. There are no Latin or Greek courses anywhere in the public schools here, AFAIK. Only about 1 in 5 high schools here even has an AP calculus class offered. If a student attends a HS that does not offer the class, he/she is bussed across town.
     
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