Localization of the nerve problem by nerve conduction test

In summary: Can a signal processing technique be used to localize the site of the nerve problem from the nerve conduction test (NCT) signal?
  • #1
Adel Makram
635
15
Given that we know the affected root and dermatome, can the nerve conduction test be used to localize the site of the nerve problem? I mean can it tell the distance of the pathology compressing on the nerve from the skin surface?
 
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  • #2
Adel Makram said:
Given that we know the affected root and dermatome, can the nerve conduction test be used to localize the site of the nerve problem? I mean can it tell the distance of the pathology compressing on the nerve from the skin surface?
Please post at least one study in a peer reviewed journal where this is discussed so that we do not have to guess what you mean. Thank you.

And members, please do not post guesses, let the OP post what he means.
 
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  • #3
Evo said:
Please post at least one study in a peer reviewed journal where this is discussed so that we do no have to guess what you mean. Thank you.

And members, please do not post guesses, let the OP post what he means.
I asked a specific question and I don`t have any reference for the answer which why I asked the question. If you have a specific answer (yes or no) just post it.
 
  • #4
Adel Makram said:
I asked a specific question and I don`t have any reference for the answer which why I asked the question. If you have a specific answer (yes or no) just post it.
No, you need to post a suitable reference for the question you are asking. Which nerve conduction test, there is more than one. It is for you to tell us exactly what you are asking, it is not for us to guess.

I have agreed to the following post.
 
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  • #5
I am interested to know if a signal processing technique can tell the location of the nerve impingement or compression from processing the nerve conduction test (NCT) signal. MRI sometimes fails to answer where the exact site of the compression along the nerve is.
 

Related to Localization of the nerve problem by nerve conduction test

1. What is a nerve conduction test?

A nerve conduction test, also known as nerve conduction study (NCS), is a medical procedure used to evaluate the function of nerves and muscles. It involves the use of small electrical shocks to stimulate nerves and record their responses, allowing doctors to determine if there is any nerve damage or dysfunction.

2. Why is a nerve conduction test performed?

A nerve conduction test is performed to identify and diagnose nerve problems such as nerve injuries, nerve compression, and nerve disorders like carpal tunnel syndrome. It can also be used to monitor the progress of nerve damage and to guide treatment plans.

3. How is a nerve conduction test performed?

During a nerve conduction test, small electrodes are placed on the skin over the nerve being tested. A small electrical shock is then delivered to stimulate the nerve and the response is recorded. This process is repeated for different nerves and muscles in the body. The test is non-invasive and typically takes about 30-60 minutes to complete.

4. Is a nerve conduction test painful?

Most people experience mild discomfort during a nerve conduction test, but it is generally not considered painful. The electrical shocks may cause a tingling or burning sensation, but it should only last for a few seconds. If you experience significant pain, it is important to let your doctor know.

5. Are there any risks or side effects associated with a nerve conduction test?

A nerve conduction test is a safe procedure and there are usually no risks or side effects. However, some people may experience mild bruising or soreness at the site of the electrodes. In rare cases, the electrical shocks may cause a temporary increase in muscle weakness, but this typically resolves within a few hours.

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