M6.0 Earthquake and aftershocks, Island of Crete, Greece

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In summary, a M 6.0 earthquake occurred 7 km NNW of Thrapsanón, Greece, on September 27, 2021 at 06:17:22 UTC. This earthquake is related to the ongoing convergence and subduction of the African and Eurasian plates in the Mediterranean region, which is characterized by high seismic and volcanic activity. Aftershocks are common after significant earthquakes, and the ones mentioned in the conversation are typical for this event. Our thoughts are with those affected by this earthquake, and we continue to monitor and study these events to improve our understanding and preparedness for future earthquakes.
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M 6.0 - 7 km NNW of Thrapsanón, Greece​

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000fes8/executive

  • 2021-09-27 06:17:22 (UTC)
  • 35.252°N 25.260°E
  • 8.7 km depth

Seismotectonics of the Mediterranean Region and Vicinity​

The Mediterranean region is seismically active due to the northward convergence (4-10 mm/yr) of the African plate with respect to the Eurasian plate along a complex plate boundary. This convergence began approximately 50 Ma and was associated with the closure of the Tethys Sea. The modern day remnant of the Tethys Sea is the Mediterranean Sea. The highest rates of seismicity in the Mediterranean region are found along the Hellenic subduction zone of southern Greece, along the North Anatolian Fault Zone of western Turkey and the Calabrian subduction zone of southern Italy. Local high rates of convergence at the Hellenic subduction zone (35mm/yr) are associated with back-arc spreading throughout Greece and western Turkey above the subducting Mediterranean oceanic crust. Crustal normal faulting throughout this region is a manifestation of extensional tectonics associated with the back-arc spreading. The region of the Marmara Sea is a transition zone between this extensional regime, to the west, and the strike-slip regime of the North Anatolian Fault Zone, to the east. The North Anatolian Fault accommodates much of the right-lateral horizontal motion (23-24 mm/yr) between the Anatolian micro-plate and Eurasian plate as the Anatolian micro-plate is being pushed westward to further accommodate closure of the Mediterranean basin caused by the collision of the African and Arabian plates in southeastern Turkey. Subduction of the Mediterranean Sea floor beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea at the Calabrian subduction zone causes a significant zone of seismicity around Sicily and southern Italy. Active volcanoes are located above intermediate depth earthquakes in the Cyclades of the Aegean Sea and in southern Italy.
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000fes8/region-info

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-58705376
At least one person has been killed and nine injured after a 5.8-magnitude earthquake hit the Greek island of Crete, local officials say.

The man died when the dome of a church that was being renovated in the town of Arkalochori caved in.
Aftershocks
4.8 5 km ENE of Pýrgos, Greece
2021-09-27 04:02:25 (UTC-07:00)10.0 km

4.4 4 km E of Kastélli, Greece
2021-09-27 01:21:58 (UTC-07:00)10.0 km

4.2 8 km W of Arkalochóri, Greece
2021-09-27 00:46:31 (UTC-07:00)10.0 km

4.5 1 km N of Kokkíni Cháni, Greece
2021-09-27 00:30:46 (UTC-07:00)10.0 km

4.6 Crete, Greece
2021-09-26 23:37:45 (UTC-07:00)7.4 km
 
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Thank you for sharing the information about the recent earthquake near Thrapsanón, Greece. I can provide some additional insight into the seismotectonics of the Mediterranean region and how it relates to this earthquake.

The Mediterranean region is known for its high seismic activity due to the convergence of the African and Eurasian plates. This convergence has been ongoing for millions of years and has resulted in the closure of the Tethys Sea and the formation of the Mediterranean Sea. The highest rates of seismicity in this region are found along the Hellenic subduction zone in southern Greece, where the African plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate.

The earthquake near Thrapsanón occurred in a seismically active area known as the Hellenic Arc, which extends from the western coast of Turkey to the southern tip of Greece. This area is characterized by frequent earthquakes, as well as volcanic activity in places like the Cyclades and southern Italy. The M 6.0 earthquake that occurred at a depth of 8.7 km is likely related to the ongoing convergence and subduction of the African plate beneath the Eurasian plate.

Aftershocks are common after a significant earthquake, and the ones you mentioned in your post are typical for this type of event. These aftershocks can continue for days, weeks, or even months after the initial earthquake, but they generally decrease in magnitude over time.

I also want to express my condolences for the loss of life and injuries caused by this earthquake. It serves as a reminder of the importance of earthquake preparedness and building codes in seismically active regions.

Thank you for bringing attention to this event and the ongoing seismic activity in the Mediterranean region. As scientists, it is crucial to monitor and study these earthquakes to improve our understanding of the Earth's processes and potentially mitigate future impacts.
 

Related to M6.0 Earthquake and aftershocks, Island of Crete, Greece

1. What caused the M6.0 earthquake on the Island of Crete?

The M6.0 earthquake on the Island of Crete was caused by tectonic plates shifting along the Hellenic Arc, a region known for its high seismic activity. The specific fault responsible for the earthquake is the Hellenic Trench, where the African Plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian Plate.

2. How common are earthquakes on the Island of Crete?

The Island of Crete experiences frequent seismic activity due to its location near the boundary of the African and Eurasian Plates. However, earthquakes of this magnitude (M6.0) are less common and are considered to be moderate to strong earthquakes.

3. What are aftershocks and why do they occur after an earthquake?

Aftershocks are smaller earthquakes that occur after a larger earthquake in the same region. They are caused by the readjustment of the Earth's crust after the initial earthquake, and can continue for days, weeks, or even months after the main event.

4. Is the Island of Crete at risk for future earthquakes?

Yes, the Island of Crete is at risk for future earthquakes due to its location near a major tectonic boundary. Earthquakes cannot be predicted, but scientists continue to monitor the region and assess the potential for future seismic activity.

5. What precautions should be taken after an earthquake and its aftershocks?

After an earthquake and its aftershocks, it is important to follow safety guidelines and stay informed about any potential hazards. This includes checking for any damage to buildings or structures, avoiding damaged areas, and being prepared for potential power outages or disruptions in services. It is also important to have an emergency plan in place and to be aware of evacuation routes and designated safe areas in case of future earthquakes.

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