Macroscopic properties of matter

In summary: It is a very active and growing field.In summary, the macroscopic properties of matter come into play when we consider things like atoms and molecules. At these small scales, the statistical effects of matter (such as the Pauli exclusion principle) already dominate. However, as we move up to larger scales, finite size confinement starts to have an effect. This is where things like the Planck mass (10^-8 kg) and the black hole come in. According to DiracPool, the black hole is created when the Planck mass fits into a Planck length, and the quarks and protons inside of it merge together. Unfortunately, the question does not have a well-defined answer, and there is still much
  • #1
Naveen345
19
0
When do macroscopic properties of matter come into picture?
When we consider 2 atoms, 20 atoms, 200 atoms or 200000000000… atoms? I hope I have conveyed my meaning?
 
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  • #2
Naveen345 said:
When do macroscopic properties of matter come into picture?
When we consider 2 atoms, 20 atoms, 200 atoms or 200000000000… atoms? I hope I have conveyed my meaning?

statistical effects already dominate at something like 1000 molecules... don't remember my stat mech too well though. it is pretty hard to make something with only a few hundred to a few thousand molecules and no more, no less. it is also hard to apply these to useful technologies.

however for real materials, finite size confinement starts having effect at relatively easily observable length scales: 1-1000 nm.
 
  • #3
When do macroscopic properties of matter come into picture?

When you say macroscopic, do you mean classical behavior versus quantum? I've heard the bridge between these two comes in just about the Planck mass, which is roughly 10^-8 kg. You can split your atoms up any which way you want as far as I know, its not so much about the number of atoms as it is about the mass per ce. Incidently, the Planck mass is supposed to be the mass that would need to fit into one Planck length in order to create a black hole. Neat, huh?
 
  • #4
DiracPool said:
When you say macroscopic, do you mean classical behavior versus quantum? I've heard the bridge between these two comes in just about the Planck mass, which is roughly 10^-8 kg. You can split your atoms up any which way you want as far as I know, its not so much about the number of atoms as it is about the mass per ce. Incidently, the Planck mass is supposed to be the mass that would need to fit into one Planck length in order to create a black hole. Neat, huh?

atom is very very hollow. But is nucleus also hollow that we can compress matter to the plank length?

Can matter be compressed even more. i am talking about the singularity at the center of a black hole.

What happens to protons and quarks there. Do they merge into each other or what?
 
  • #5
What DiracPool wrote is simply false. There can be an are much larger quantum states - the electrons in a metal, for example.
 
  • #6
What DiracPool wrote is simply false. There can be an are much larger quantum states - the electrons in a metal, for example.

I'm not sure which of the two points I made you are referring to as false, but here is the Wiki page I got my information from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_mass

If you were referring to the Planck mass and the black hole, they wrote, "The Planck mass is approximately the mass of the Planck particle, a hypothetical minuscule black hole whose Schwarzschild radius equals the Planck length."

If you were referring to the "macroscopic" comment, they wrote, "The Planck mass is an idealized mass thought to have special significance for quantum gravity when general relativity and the fundamentals of quantum physics become mutually important to describe mechanics."

Both of these quotes are under the "Significance" of the Planck mass section. Perhaps the confusion is what the OP meant by "macroscopic," but I think the OP was referring to it in the way I addressed it.
 
  • #7
DiracPool, there is no gravity of any sort in the OP's question, and the Planck mass is essentially expressing G in units of kilograms. It has nothing to do with his question.

Unfortunately, his question doesn't have a well-defined answer. There is a field called mesoscopic physics that studies the transition from atoms to bulk materials, and there are not any sharp defining lines.
 

Related to Macroscopic properties of matter

1. What are macroscopic properties of matter?

Macroscopic properties of matter are physical characteristics that can be observed and measured without the need for magnification or specialized equipment. They include properties such as mass, volume, density, and temperature.

2. How are macroscopic properties of matter different from microscopic properties?

Macroscopic properties refer to the overall characteristics of a substance that can be observed with the naked eye, while microscopic properties refer to the behavior and characteristics of individual particles that make up the substance.

3. How are macroscopic properties of matter measured?

Macroscopic properties of matter are measured using various instruments and techniques such as scales for measuring mass, rulers for measuring volume, thermometers for measuring temperature, and density meters for measuring density.

4. Can macroscopic properties change?

Yes, macroscopic properties of matter can change under different conditions such as changes in temperature, pressure, or chemical reactions. For example, the volume of a gas will change when the temperature or pressure changes.

5. Why are macroscopic properties of matter important in science?

Macroscopic properties of matter are important in science because they help us understand and describe the behavior of substances in our everyday lives. They also provide a foundation for understanding more complex concepts in chemistry and physics.

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