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Mag 5.0 - 49km N of Boudinar, Morocco

  1. Mar 4, 2016 #1

    Astronuc

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    M5.0 - 49km N of Boudinar, Morocco
    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us10004ubk#general_region

    Wow - it's not often one sees an earthquake of that magnitude in that part of the Mediterranean!

    2016-03-03 11:36:27 (UTC)

    49km (30mi) N of Boudinar, Morocco
    54km (34mi) NE of Tirhanimine, Morocco
    57km (35mi) NNE of Imzourene, Morocco
    64km (40mi) WNW of Melilla, Spain
    174km (108mi) ESE of Gibraltar, Gibraltar

    Lat 35.593 °N, Long 3.542 °W
    depth = 10.0 km (6.2 mi)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2016 #2
    Thanks for the post! This is an automated courtesy bump. Sorry you aren't generating responses at the moment. Do you have any further information, come to any new conclusions or is it possible to reword the post?
     
  4. Mar 10, 2016 #3

    davenn

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    it's been one of a bursts of events in that spot over the last few weeks
    Starting with a M5.1 on the 22/2

    Quakes western Mediterranean.JPG
     
  5. Mar 10, 2016 #4

    davenn

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  6. Mar 12, 2016 #5
    Public information at the Spanish Geological Institute website:

    https://www.ign.es/ign/layout/sismo.do [Broken]
    http://info.igme.es/eventos/TerremotoAlboran

    Basic Spanish will be enough to understand most of it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  7. Mar 12, 2016 #6
    BTW, since I'm not seeing it in this forum, the strongest one was on Jan 25th 2016 at 04:22AM GMT, epicenter 35.6004 -3.8056, "scored" 6.3 Mw:

    https://www.ign.es/ign/layoutIn/sismoDetalleTerremotos.do?locale=es&evid=1362673&zona=1 [Broken]

    Further info:

    https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terremoto_del_mar_de_Alborán_de_2016

    It killed 1 person in Morocco and was felt in large areas of Andalucía (including Almería, Málaga, Granada and even Córdoba), as well as in the Spanish territory of Melilla, where it (slightly) wounded 26 people and caused minor damage. Definitely unusual.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  8. Mar 13, 2016 #7

    Astronuc

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    Thanks for indicating this. So activity has picked up in this area, this year.

    M6.3 - 50km NNE of Al Hoceima, Morocco
    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us10004gy9#general_region
    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/tectonic/images/mediterranean_tsum.pdf

    I wonder if we should expect a larger earthquake in the vicinity in the near term. Are the coastal areas and nations of Mediterranean region prepared?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  9. Mar 13, 2016 #8

    Astronuc

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    Last edited: Mar 13, 2016
  10. Mar 13, 2016 #9

    davenn

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  11. Mar 13, 2016 #10

    Astronuc

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    Before the two today

    Code (Text):
    time,                        lat  ,   long  , depth, mag
    2016-03-11 T04:16:48.030Z, 35.7334,  -3.5836,    10, 5.3
    2016-03-09 T23:46:07.720Z, 35.6823,  -3.553 ,    10, 4.9
    2016-03-03 T11:36:27.760Z, 35.5933,  -3.5422,    10, 5
    2016-02-28 T11:03:17.630Z, 35.5718,  -3.5728, 11.72, 4.3
    2016-02-23 T10:12:33.000Z, 35.7094,  -3.5584,    10, 4.7
    2016-02-23 T08:46:01.010Z, 35.6866,  -3.6285,    10, 4.8
    2016-02-22 T04:14:30.100Z, 35.7366,  -3.5222,    10, 4.6
    2016-02-22 T03:46:02.450Z, 35.735 ,  -3.5106,    10, 5.1
    2016-02-08 T11:21:43.780Z, 35.3652,  -3.8782,  8.47, 4.2
    2016-02-03 T21:27:49.390Z, 35.6091,  -3.7462,    10, 4
    2016-02-01 T23:50:48.860Z, 35.4566,  -3.8528,    10, 4.2
    2016-01-31 T16:25:27.440Z, 36.5911,  -3.0498,    10, 4.9
    2016-01-29 T01:16:20.570Z, 35.4263,  -3.8032,    10, 4.1
    2016-01-28 T19:48:51.410Z, 35.474 ,  -3.8039,    10, 4.5
    2016-01-27 T21:57:49.590Z, 35.5796,  -3.7851,    10, 4.3
    2016-01-27 T06:32:08.060Z, 35.6926,  -3.578 ,    10, 4.9
    2016-01-26 T04:35:59.240Z, 35.5265,  -3.6992,    10, 4.5
    2016-01-26 T01:16:45.990Z, 35.4901,  -3.9411,   1.2, 4.1
    2016-01-25 T18:17:33.430Z, 35.5892,  -3.7684,    10, 4.1
    2016-01-25 T16:02:43.560Z, 35.5363,  -3.7839,    10, 4.3
    2016-01-25 T14:52:42.740Z, 35.739 ,  -3.5856,    10, 4.9
    2016-01-25 T11:29:23.070Z, 35.4901,  -3.7475, 21.43, 4.4
    2016-01-25 T08:25:06.100Z, 35.5453,  -3.6703,    10, 4.7
    2016-01-25 T08:15:29.050Z, 35.6955,  -3.6741,    10, 4.1
    2016-01-25 T07:55:15.780Z, 35.4917,  -3.8394,    10, 4.2
    2016-01-25 T06:10:41.960Z, 35.5051,  -3.8783,    10, 5.2
    2016-01-25 T05:54:05.460Z, 35.4764,  -3.7734,    10, 5.1
    2016-01-25 T05:37:11.890Z, 35.4992,  -3.8211,    10, 4.2
    2016-01-25 T05:03:46.300Z, 35.6749,  -3.7449,    10, 4.7
    2016-01-25 T04:34:19.170Z, 35.6805,  -3.723 ,    10, 5.3
    2016-01-25 T04:30:55.190Z, 35.5953,  -3.8166,    10, 5
    2016-01-25 T04:22:02.730Z, 35.6493,  -3.6818,    12, 6.3
    2016-01-21 T13:47:19.860Z, 35.6236,  -3.65  ,    10, 5.1
    January had a swarm, particularly after the mag 6.3. Is it picking up again?
     
  12. Mar 13, 2016 #11
    You're very welcome. :smile: Yes, it seems so. While 6.3 Mw earthquakes are not so rare onshore, I am not aware of anyone else so powerful in the Alboran Sea, much less "lasting" for over 6 weeks.

    Here in Spain we have had quite extensive seismo-resistant building codes for ages, especially enforced in the South and Southeast, which are well-known seismic areas. On the opposite, since large tsunamis are exceedingly rare in this side of the Mediterranean (the last major one happened about 11,500 years ago as a result of a submarine landslide), there's no preparedness that I'm aware of (which is quite frightening in the Atlantic side of Gibraltar, the scenario of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami originated in the AGFZ... it killed people in coastal Cádiz and Huelva too. Those areas were not very populated back then, but now they sure are, and there're lots of industry too. Even the Rota Naval Base is there.)

    The deadliest earthquake in Spain in recent times was in Lorca (inner Murcia) in 2011, killing 9 and causing kind-of-extensive damage (depending on zones and especially in historical buildings), but only because it was a bit strange: very shallow (barely 1 km) with the epicenter about 3-4 km from the city center and a weird horizontal "slipping" component; its actual magnitude was just Mw=5.1. We have had way more powerful earthquakes in Southern Spain (like a 6.3 Mw in Albuñuelas, Granada, on April 11th 2010, and it caused zero damage or injuries. Same in Isla Cristina, Huelva, on December 17th 2009. That Lorca thing was weird, I'm telling you.)

    So here in Spain, I'd say yes quite a lot for earthquakes, not at all for large tsunamis, which don't seem to be a probable issue along the entire Mediterranean coastline, but they could be in the Southwestern Atlantic coast. I happen to live in a coastal Mediterranean city, very close to the sea, and I'd sure bet my life running up the stairs of any building ---which will most probably withstand the earthquake--- to flee an incoming tsunami ---which is going to "enter all the way up to the kitchen" as we say here, since there are no defenses--- that seems to be highly improbable except for coastal Cádiz and Huelva. If you can read Spanish, I'd suggest you this article about tsunamis in Spanish and Western Mediterranean waters from a popular science blog which is widely regarded as the best or one of the best ones in Spain: http://www.lapizarradeyuri.com/2014/05/08/big95-el-gran-tsunami-del-mediterraneo-espanol/

    I don't know about Portugal, but I have been there a couple of times and at first sight I'd tend to think they will be more or less similarly prepared. On the opposite, I've visited Morocco too and I'm pretty sure that quite a lot of the "popular" buildings there wouldn't withstand a serious earthquake... you just need to see them to realize it. Possibly the newest ones and modern infrastructures will have some built-in seismo-resistance, but I wouldn't bet one single euro for the others. Very much like Algeria, where I have never been, but every time they have a powerful earthquake it seems to kill thousands. --- Actually, I have just checked and the 2004 Al Hoceima earthquake, also a 6.3 Mw, killed around 630 persons and left 15,000 homeless. Notice how similar earthquakes on the Spanish side didn't kill or injure anyone and caused no reported damage, except for that strange Lorca thing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2016
  13. Mar 15, 2016 #12
    A 4.8 mbLg tonight:

    http://www.ign.es/ign/layoutIn/sismoDetalleTerremotos.do?locale=es&evid=ign2016ffom&zona=1 [Broken]

    ...among many others:

    http://www.ign.es/ign/layoutIn/sismoListadoTerremotos.do?locale=es&zona=1&cantidad_dias=5 [Broken] (notice how many "ALBORÁN SUR" are there.)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  14. Mar 15, 2016 #13

    davenn

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  15. Mar 15, 2016 #14
    Wow. It's the same earthquake. Here it's been "re-scored" from 4.8 to 5.1 mbLg just a couple minutes ago:

    http://www.ign.es/ign/layoutIn/sismoDetalleTerremotos.do?locale=es&evid=ign2016ffom&zona=1 [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  16. Mar 15, 2016 #15

    davenn

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    Yeah, ... mblg is sort of an oddball magnitude scale
    The USGS ( for a quake of that magnitude) will be most likely be using plain Mb ( body wave magnitude)
    Altho they would have probably assigned a Mw value for it. Mw magnitudes are generally not the one used
    unless the event is in the M6.0 and up size (and it isn't uncommon to see 6.0 - 6.4 events with a Mb listing).


    Dave
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  17. Mar 15, 2016 #16
    Here they use any http://www.ign.es/ign/head/sismoTipoMagnitud.do [Broken], as defined in the http://www.ign.es/ign/layoutIn/sismoListadoTerremotos.do?locale=es&zona=1&cantidad_dias=5 [Broken], I guess out of convenience. mbLg seems to be quite used, I don't know why. Later they (usually) reassess the largest ones (5+ or so) and convert the magnitude to Mw.

    Definitely we're having a party here during the last weeks in the Alboran Sea.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  18. Mar 15, 2016 #17

    davenn

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    what country are you from ?
     
  19. Mar 15, 2016 #18
    Spain, Eastern Mediterranean coast, very close to that old sea of the Western civilization... :wink:
     
  20. Mar 15, 2016 #19

    davenn

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    wow cool !! :)

    Im in Sydney, Australia, but home country is New Zealand .... with the nickname " The shaky Isles"

    Dave
     
  21. Mar 15, 2016 #20
    Heck, I've always wanted to discover those "South Seas." :wink: Unfortunately it hasn't been possible... by now! :-p
     
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